Brisbane International: Almost perfect Pliskova demolishes Cornet

first_imgKarolina Pliskova, left, beat Alize Cornet in two sets, 6-0, 6-3, in the final of the Brisbane International on Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017. (Photo from Pliskova’s Facebook page)Brisbane, Australia — Karolina Pliskova stamped herself as a major contender for the Australian Open with a 6-0, 6-3 demolition of France’s Alize Cornet in the final of the Brisbane International on Saturday.The third-seeded Czech played almost perfect tennis in the first set, racing through it in just 18 minutes with the shell-shocked Cornet only winning five points.ADVERTISEMENT PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption PLAY LIST 02:01Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption00:50Trending Articles02:13Almost 90 rogue cops dismissed under Gamboa’s watch01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Her groundstrokes were also devastating, often keeping the unseeded Cornet pinned deep in the court.As a result of the win, Pliskova will leapfrog Dominika Cibulkova to become world number five when the next rankings are released on Monday.She will likely be one of the favorites to win the Australian Open and go one better than her runner-up effort to Angelique Kerber at last year’s US Open.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img We are young Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Cornet didn’t get on the board until she held serve in the first game of the second set, which drew almost the loudest cheer of the night from the full house at the Pat Rafter Arena.But while the Frenchwoman recovered in the second set, Pliskova was far too strong and took the match in just 66 minutes on her second championship point.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are youngPliskova stands at 1.86 meters tall and has one of the most effective serves in the women’s game.She sent down four aces in the first set and three in the second and was able to serve her way out of trouble on the few occasions Cornet was able put any pressure on her. MOST READ EDITORS’ PICK Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Senators to proceed with review of VFA NLEX upsets TNT for much-needed win View commentslast_img read more

Elite failed to recover from ‘sloppy’ start vs SMB

first_imgWhere did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine MOST READ NSAS make SEAG medal projections Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award PLAY LIST 01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town We are young And for reserve Raymond Aguilar, it’s definitely not the way  would like to play if you’re against a team as strong as San Miguel.“Sloppy kasi yung first half namin. Medyo natambakan na kaya ang hirap habulin,” he said. “Pagpasok ko, walang gana. Ang lamig eh, tapos June Mar (Fajardo) agad ang katapat kaya ang bigat.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are young(Our first half was sloppy. We got down early so it was hard to come back. When I entered, we were already demoralized. We’re cold, then I was matched up against June Mar so it was tough.)With Blackwater’s key guys limited, Aguilar made the most out of his minutes and fired 15 points in the game, 10 coming in the fourth quarter, where the Elite pulled within 11, 101-90. Senators to proceed with review of VFA Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHcenter_img Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town But it wasn’t too long before San Miguel stepped on the gas pedal anew and cruised to its fifth straight win.“Yung laro namin nung second half, yun dapat ang nilaro namin nung first half. Nakahabol naman ng kaunti kaso kapos talaga (Our second half play should have been the way we played in the first half. We trimmed the lead down but it’s too late.),” said the veteran big man.If there’s any silver lining for Blackwater, it’s that coach Leo Isaac can lean on a number of his reserves, with Aguilar and Roi Sumang stepping up late.But it will take more than those two as the Elite seek to secure a quarterfinal seat in their final three games this 2017 PBA Philippine Cup.“Sana maka-dalawa or isang panalo para makapasok kami. Pray lang (ai hope we get two or a win so we can advance. We just have to pray.),” said Aguilar.ADVERTISEMENT PH among economies most vulnerable to virus PBA IMAGESAlready up against a fancied foe, Blackwater made its predicament harder by coming out slow in its 118-93 loss to San Miguel on Friday.That lackluster showing was further put in the spotlight as the Beermen took turns in eviscerating the Elite en route to a 29-point edge at one point in the first half.ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter EDITORS’ PICK Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports View commentslast_img read more

Cheap prices lead to more exotic pets in the wild, research finds

first_imgAmphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Citizen Science, Conservation, Environment, Extinction, Frogs, Herps, Invasive Species, National Parks, Pet Trade, Pets, Reptiles, Research, Wetlands, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade New research shows that exotic amphibians and reptiles sold inexpensively as pets are more likely to end up in the wild, where they can pose problems for native wildlife.The authors of the study believe that many pet owners may not fully understand the responsibility of owning these animals, some of which can grow to large sizes and live for decades.They suggest that limiting the numbers of certain species popular as pets could help limit their often-destructive impact on ecosystems. Exotic pets that grow to be big adults and are inexpensive to buy are more likely to end up in the wild, according to a recent study.“It is difficult to unravel why an owner might release their household companion,” ecologist Oliver Stringham of Rutgers University in the United States said in a statement. “Impulsive buying decisions without proper research about care requirements could be a reason.”Stringham was the lead author of a study published in the Journal of Applied Ecology on Aug. 21.A vendor’s display of exotic snakes available for purchase at an exotic pet expo. Image © Diane Episcopio.These non-native animals can struggle, more than their erstwhile owners might think, to make a go of their new environments at times. But more destructively, they can also wipe out the animals they go after as prey, outcompete local species, and bring new and deadly diseases, all of which increase the likelihood of the extinction of native wildlife.Researchers know that the pet trade is how most reptiles and amphibians from other locales end up wreaking havoc in new habitats. It’s how the Burmese python, a 5.5-meter (18-foot) predator, has taken up residence in Florida’s Everglades National Park in the past few decades, where it’s likely been a part of driving down resident bird and mammal species. Still, the factors that have opened such pipelines have remained a mystery.Stringham and his colleagues counted more than 1,700 species of reptiles and amphibians that were sold as pets between 1999 and 2016. Lizards topped the list at 739 species, followed by snakes at 490 species. They then looked for which ones most commonly ended up in the wild as non-native species, based on prior research and counts by citizen scientists of these animal invaders. The team also looked for common traits, such as the life expectancy and body mass of different species, that occurred in animals that were more frequently set free.In addition to affordability, reptiles and amphibians that grow to large sizes and live long lives were more likely to be released. Once these animals have been purchased, exotic pet owners might decide that they’re ill-equipped to handle them, Stringham said.The green iguana is a common exotic pet that originates from Central and South America. Image © Matthew Sileo.“They may underestimate the space and costs needed to keep such animals as they grow into adults,” he said. Sentimentality, too, might play a role.“Understandably, some owners may not wish to euthanise their pet for ethical or emotional attachment reasons,” Stringham said.He and his colleagues suggest that better-informed pet owners could provide a potential solution. Policies directed at keeping large numbers of animals from setting up shop in a new environment could also help, before the problem becomes insurmountable, ecologist Julie Lockwood, also of Rutgers University, said in the statement.This Burmese python was captured in Everglades National Park in Florida, where the invasive snakes have established a large breeding population. Image by Susan Jewell/USFWS (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons.“Stopping an established species from spreading is often not possible, and if at all, very expensive to eradicate,” Lockwood said.“When it comes to tackling nature invaders, it is best to take a precautionary approach,” she added. “While it might not be possible to fully prevent the release of exotic pets, reducing the number can be an effective way to prevent new species from becoming established and potentially invasive.”Banner image of a Burmese python by Susan Jewell/USFWS (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons. Citation Stringham, O. C., & Lockwood, J. L. (2018). Pet problems: Biological and economic factors that influence the release of alien reptiles and amphibians by pet owners. Journal of Applied Ecology.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

China’s primates could disappear by end of this century, study warns

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta China has some 25 species of primates, of which 15 to 18 have fewer than 3,000 individuals surviving in the wild, according to a new study.Two species of gibbons have become extinct in China in just the past two decades, while two other species of gibbons have fewer than 30 individuals in the country.Researchers warn that primate distributions in China could shrink by 51 percent to 87 percent by the end of this century.Expanding suitable habitat for primates is critical, the researchers say, as is prioritizing a network of protected corridors that can connect isolated primate subpopulations. Most primates in China could be wiped out by the end of this century, a new study warns.China is the second-most primate-rich country in Asia, with 25 known species of non-human primates, including lorises, macaques, langurs, snub-nosed monkeys, and gibbons. Since the 1950s, though, primate populations have declined drastically, largely due to clearing of large tracts of forests for farmland and plantations; industry; roads, railways and other infrastructure; and urbanization. In this rapidly changing landscape, China’s primates are struggling to survive.Some 80 percent of China’s primates are currently listed as threatened (either vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered) on the IUCN Red List, researchers report in the study in Biodiversity and Conservation, which reviewed the status of China’s primates.Of the 25 primate species, 15 to 18 have fewer than 3,000 individuals surviving in the wild. Two species of gibbons, the northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) and the white-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar yunnanensis), have disappeared from China in just the past two decades. While the two gibbon species are present in other parts of Asia, their status is dire: they are listed as endangered (white-handed gibbon) or critically endangered (northern white-cheeked gibbon) on the IUCN Red List.“Such gloomy profiles actually did not surprise me — given I grew up in the countryside of China, engaged with zoology of the region for years and witnessed the procedures of environment damages,” co-author Ruliang Pan, an adjunct senior research fellow at the University of Western Australia, told Mongabay in an email. “My biggest concern, perhaps of all the co-authors’, is wondering how much time the primates in China still have to co-exist with humans. We used to have a great ape (orangutans) and two species of the gibbons, which became extirpated in just the wink of an eye.”Northern white-cheeked gibbon in Planckendael Zoo, Belgium. Image by Ad Meskens via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Two more gibbon species could be heading toward extinction in China soon. The Hainan black crested gibbon (Nomascus hainanus) has only about 20 individuals left in the wild, all of them in Bawangli National Nature Reserve on the island of Hainan. Similarly, the eastern black crested gibbon (Nomascus nasutus) has only about 100 individuals across China and Vietnam, with fewer than 30 living in China.In fact, 13 of the 25 primate species in China have fewer than 1,000 individuals remaining in the wild. These include the recently named Skywalker hoolock gibbon (Hoolock tianxing), the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), the Arunachal macaque (Macaca munzala), the northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina), Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri), gray snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus brelichi), white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus), and Shortridge’s langur (Trachypithecus shortridgei).To see how the primates would do in the future, the researchers modeled the effects of expanding agriculture on primate distributions over the next 25 to 75 years. They found that under the most “optimistic” scenario, which presumes the country moving toward a cleaner and more resource-efficient society, primate distribution will likely decline by 51 percent by the year 2100. Under the business-as-usual scenario, which assumes China will continue with its current national policies, gibbons, lorises and most langur species will be lost. Under the “pessimistic” scenario, which assumes that China’s national policies will allow agriculture to expand into currently protected areas, primate distributions will shrink by 87 percent by end of this century — that is, most of China’s primate populations will face extinction.“The modelling in the paper predicted some worst scenarios on primate status in China over the next 25-75 years,” Wen Xiao, a researcher at the Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity Research at Dali University, Yunnan, who was not part of the study, told Mongabay in an email. “It may not be that bad, because it is based on most rapid agricultural expansion data in China between 1961 and 1990; deforestation and agriculture expansion trend has stopped to some extent now as suggested in this paper. But people should know how bad it can be and be alert.”A pygmy slow loris. Image by David Haring/Duke Lemur Center via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Pan said it was critical for the Chinese government to reshape its eco-social development strategies. “The good sign is that the current regime has started thinking about the problems.”The government has had some success with the Hainan gibbons, for example. By the 1980s, there were only 10 Hainan gibbons remaining in the wild, down from an estimated 2,000 in the 1960s. The population has grown slightly since then, with around 20 Hainan gibbons living in Bawangli National Nature Reserve, thanks to a reforestation program that had the goal of converting pine plantations into a mix of native and non-native forest.“The program has been aiming at increasing plants consumed by the gibbons; instead of planting exotic species, the seeds from the plants eaten by the gibbons were collected and planted in primary forest,” Pan said. This type of reforestation program that aims to restore and expand the naturally occurring foods and plant species that gibbons and other primates need is essential to their survival, Pan added.The Chinese government has set aside some 1.6 million square kilometers (620,000 square miles) under national nature reserves, provincial reserves or local reserves. But very few primates occur within the larger national reserves, the researchers say.“Although China has expanded its system of nature reserves (which has helped reduce deforestation and hunting within reserve boundaries but not in areas adjacent to reserves), and has allocated billions of dollars to reforestation, most of these programs are not designed to regenerate native habitats, which are crucial for primate survival,” the authors write in the paper.Northern pig-tailed macaque. Image by JJ Harrison via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Expanding suitable habitat for primates is critical, as is prioritizing a network of protected corridors that can connect isolated primate subpopulations. More importantly, for China’s monkeys, langurs, lorises and gibbons to survive well into the future, the Chinese government, Chinese scientists, national and international conservation organizations, and the Chinese public must work together, the researchers add.“It is very necessary to have a joint international unit in China to oversee primate conservation issues, strategies and commitments,” Pan said. “Such a unit based in a Chinese university could bring together scientists, politicians, conservation organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, social media and public to efficiently and systematically carry on a series of conservation implantations. Such a mission could be practiced through sharing databases, information and research results, particularly scientific models for conservation.”Paul Garber, a primatologist at the University of Illinois, said in a statement that non-human primates represented our closest living relatives and played “an important role in maintaining the health of tropical forest ecosystems and serve as models for understanding human evolution, health, behaviour, biology, cognition, and sociality.”“China is facing a historic moment and has one final opportunity to balance economic growth and environmental sustainability, or face the unprecedented loss of animal and plant biodiversity,” he added.Lar gibbons at Salzburg zoo. Image by MatthiasKabel via Wikimedia Commons (Multi-license with GFDL and CC-BY 2.5).Citation:Li, B., Li, M., Li, J., Fan, P., Ni, Q., Lu, J., … & Huang, Z. (2018). The primate extinction crisis in China: immediate challenges and a way forward. Biodiversity and Conservation, 1-27. Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Gibbons, Governance, Green, Mammals, Monkeys, Primates, Research, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Studying human behavior to protect orangutans: Q&A with Liana Chua

first_imgConservation efforts have traditionally focused too much on wildlife and not enough on human communities, says social anthropologist Liana Chua.When it comes to orangutans, Chua says indigenous communities in Borneo are unlikely to share the concerns and priorities of international conservation organizations. Killing of orangutans by humans is a major threat to the apes’ survival.Devoting real attention to the issues that are important to local people is key to developing better conservation policies, Chua says.Chua leads a project billed as “a novel anthropology-conservation collaboration” that aims to improve human-orangutan coexistence in Borneo. Social anthropologist Liana Chua leads a project, POKOK, that aims to reduce the killing of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo through deeper engagement with local people.The project came about as a result of research by conservation scientist Erik Meijaard that indicated far more orangutans were killed by humans than previously assumed. His study, based on interviews with more than 5,000 villagers throughout Kalimantan, the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo, estimated that some 30,000 orangutans had been killed either for food, opportunistically while hunting, or for traditional medicine during the course of these people’s lifetimes. Another 25,000 to 35,000 were also killed for so-called conflict reasons — encroaching onto palm oil plantations, for instance, or raiding food crops — in the same period.Chua’s research is still in its early stages, but she says fieldwork has already backs up her suspicion that while orangutans are an international conservation cause célèbre, indigenous communities in Borneo do not generally share this deep concern for the species’ welfare.In an interview with Mongabay, Chua says she hopes her team will be able to provide deeper insights into how these communities view both orangutans and orangutan conservation, and that these insights will lead to better-informed conservation policies with real benefits for both apes and people.Social anthropologist Liana Chua crossing a bamboo suspension bridge in Borneo. Image courtesy of Liana Chua.Mongabay: What first sparked your interest in orangutans?Liana Chua: I’ve done fieldwork with the Bidayuh, an indigenous group in Malaysian Borneo, since 2003, and I spent my postdoctoral research tracing the experiences of people from four villages who were displaced by a dam construction project. Through this, I became aware of the very many land disputes that were taking place across Borneo and the ways in which indigenous rights were coming into conflict with the priorities of the state. And in orangutan conservation, we see similar struggles of land and indigenous rights coming up against the priorities of conservationists and the state.So why did you want to get involved in conservation?Orangutan conservation is pushed by zoologists and biologists who don’t necessarily grasp the human dimension of what’s going on. In the initial stages of my research, I came into contact with Erik Meijaard, who told me about his evidence that the killing of orangutans, and not just deforestation, was a major driver of their declining populations, and he asked me if we could address this problem together, using social anthropological methods and perspectives.Why are orangutans being killed?There appear to be a number of reasons. One of them is directly linked to deforestation and palm oil cultivation: they are being squeezed into areas that humans are also using, resulting in conflict because they can damage crops and raid fruit trees. You get hunting, too, and this is more common in heavily forested areas and is an offshoot of traditional practices. People have always hunted various forms of game for food, and they don’t see why orangutans should be special. This is often opportunistic. Sometimes, they just see this shadowy thing moving about in the jungle and shoot it.Young orangutans at a care center in Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. The attention lavished on orangutans baffles some of the people who live among them, Chua says. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Do these people know orangutans are a protected species?I think some, if not all, people are aware, but it doesn’t necessarily bother them. In Sarawak [in Malaysian Borneo], the government put out these posters with images of species that you are not allowed to hunt and eat. The running joke among anthropologists is that you take these posters to guys in a longhouse, and they go, ‘Right, that’s today’s menu.’ This is something they’ve been doing for a long time, and they don’t see why they should stop just because the state says so.Is there any other reason why orangutans are killed?Baby orangutans are sometimes bought by, or given to, rich and powerful individuals as pets or obtained by entertainment centers in Southeast Asia. To get hold of these, there’s always a dead mother. It might be rare, but it’s still a problem.So how do you begin to address the problem?The first thing we are not going to do is to talk about orangutans! People in remote areas are either completely indifferent to them or they are perfectly aware they are protected and they’re not going to tell you the truth about anything. My own friends in Sarawak, who live close to an area where wild orangutans are occasionally seen, are completely perplexed as to why white people keep throwing money, care and attention at this particular animal.A young orangutan in Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. A 2018 study concluded that 100,000 Bornean orangutans had been lost in the past 16 years. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.So what do you do?We want to try to figure out what local people’s priorities really are. They might be much more concerned about how they make their living, or water pollution, or about their relationship with the government, for example, and the conservation of orangutans is wrapped up in all these broader issues.Is that where you’re at now?Yes. My Ph.D. student, Paul Thung, who is doing most of the fieldwork, was in Borneo over the summer trying to get a sense of what’s going on. Now, he couldn’t lie to local people, so he had to say, ‘Yes I’m very interested in orangutans, but I really want to understand your way of life and what matters to you. How do you feel about palm oil, how do you feel about rubber, how do you feel about development?’ That’s the way to start, you certainly don’t want orangutans to be the main focus to start with — that’s a research killer.Why is this so different to traditional conservation?The way a lot of conservation is carried out is based on this complete separation between humans and nature, and that separation doesn’t necessarily exist in other cultures. It’s a very hackneyed distinction, but it has tremendous power in the way it shapes conservation policies.Western scientists talk about Borneo in terms of its primary and secondary rainforests and selectively logged forests and so on, but these terms don’t necessarily make sense for people who live there. For the Bidayuh, there might be farming areas, deep forest and community-owned forest, and then there are taboo areas where you’re not allowed to do anything because there are spirits there or something bad happened in the past. These categories are both natural and cultural, you can’t pull them apart. They’re not always recognized by conservationists or the state, but they really influence how Bidayuhs relate to the forest and its wildlife.So how can your insights make a difference?Hopefully, we will be able to use our research to come up with approaches to orangutan conservation that are better tailored to their specific cultural and social contexts. You might find that in one area, religious beliefs play a huge role in determining how people relate to the forest and orangutans. In this case, we’d ask: how can we repackage conservation messages in specific religious idioms and logics? Are there religious leaders and networks that we could collaborate with? Also, there is a lot tied up in how people respond to state intervention. In order to understand how my friends in Sarawak view orangutan conservation, for example, I need to understand how they see development and the state, because they often come as part of the same package. Things are slightly different in Indonesian Borneo, but the question is similar: how are people’s responses to conservation shaped by national, regional, and local politics? Understanding these power dynamics can give us a better idea of why some conservation initiatives work or fail. And to do this, you need in-depth, ground-up insights, which anthropological fieldwork can provide.Do you think you’ll find resentment at Western concern for orangutans?People do wonder why animals get so much more cash and attention than the humans who live in the same areas. Many of them have access to television and social media, and see orangutans being taken care of in rescue centers, and they think: ‘What about us?’ Conservationists on the ground are very aware there is a real danger of resentment over double standards, but you don’t tend to hear those concerns when you look at the fundraising and publicity side of things.Forest in Borneo cleared for oil palm plantations. The island has one of the highest deforestation rates in the world. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.What have you found out so far?On his first field trip, Paul found anecdotal evidence that people don’t care that much about orangutans, which backs up what I have heard before. He also brought back evidence that they don’t necessarily see a moral difference between working for an orangutan rescue center or an oil palm plantation. It’s often a question of which one gives them better working conditions, more money or is more convenient.So oil palm plantations offer real options for people?I don’t want to romanticize it: oil palm cultivation has caused a lot of problems, and in many ways, it’s a lot like conservation: it causes land disputes and can exacerbate existing power struggles and disagreements. And it’s not just oil palm — there’s rubber, small-scale mining and other opportunities, so it’s not very helpful to single out one particular crop and say it’s bad, you shouldn’t be cultivating it. It’s one of many possibilities for waged survival, and what we can’t do is deny people their aspirations — education for their children, access to health care and so on.Should conservationists be less precious about orangutans?Well, they would say that even a low level of killing is unsustainable because of orangutans’ very slow reproductive rate. But they might want to be more flexible about the sorts of messages they are putting out — they might want to acknowledge, for example, that conservation priorities may conflict with, or take a back seat to, local priorities. That would be a huge first step in showing people they are being taken seriously. I think it’s really dangerous to draw black-and-white distinctions.But ultimately, you want to reduce the level of killing?That’s the most immediate aim, yes, but the bigger goal is to make for a more constructive relationship between conservationists and local communities. This is a more critical long-term goal if there’s any chance of conservation taking place sustainably within them.Researcher Liana Chua (front right) says that conservation groups need to do a better job of taking into account the perspectives and concerns of local people. Image courtesy of Liana Chua.Have you seen orangutans in the wild?No, and very few of my Bornean friends have, which is really interesting, because it shows the contrast between the hyper-visibility of orangutans in the West and their invisibility in Indonesia. When I was in my field site last year, the villagers got this letter from a conservation organization which said they’d like to come and do a survey for orangutans in their area. The letter was written in Malay, and they just looked at it and said, ‘What’s an orangutan?’They didn’t know what an orangutan was?They didn’t understand the Malay word. They said, ‘Is it that the monkey with short red hair or the one with the long tail?’ We went through all these different descriptions, but eventually I showed them a postcard my daughter had bought in Kuching, and they went, ‘Oh a maias.‘ None of them had seen one. A few people in the village had in their hunting grounds, about eight hours’ walk away, quite close to the Indonesian border, but they weren’t keen for the conservationists to come, in case they found orangutans and the land became protected and they got turfed off it.So the survey didn’t take place?Actually, the conservationists did come, but they didn’t find any. When they first got the letter, they asked me if orangutans range, and I told them I thought so. And they said, ‘Good, we hope they go over the border into Indonesia so it’s not our problem.’ So even where orangutans are completely invisible and barely present, awareness of their presence can still have an impact on people’s lives.Have we in the West built the orangutan up into something it isn’t?Oh absolutely. They have this extreme visibility in Western culture, but are much less visible where they actually live. I worry about the effects of conservation on the lives of people I care quite strongly about. I know some have done quite well working for conservation groups, but there have been these negative effects, such as having their traditional land rights restricted. I think there has been much greater acknowledgment in recent years we need to get beyond the ‘parks versus people’ model, and for an anthropologist, it’s not that radical a proposition. There are conservationists working to overcome this divide in Borneo — I hope our project will bring greater local knowledge and new ideas to their efforts.Editor’s note: this interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.Banner image: Borneo orangutan, by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Borneo Orangutan, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Great Apes, Indigenous Peoples, Mammals, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Plantations, Poaching, Primates, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Trouble in Botswana’s elephant paradise as poaching said to rise

first_imgArticle published by hayat Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poachers, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Botswana is home to 130,000 elephants, a third of Africa’s total elephant population, and has gained a reputation as a sanctuary for the threatened species.The country has a hunting ban and strict anti-poaching measures in place.But a report based on an aerial survey carried out last year appears to show an alarming increase in poaching, notably of male elephants for their typically larger tusks — a finding disputed by the government.The government is considering ending the hunting ban to allow the trophy shooting and culling of elephants to get their population under control. This is the first article in a two-part series on Botswana’s population of African elephants. Read the second part, about measures to deal with the number of elephants, here.CHOBE NATIONAL PARK, Botswana — The strong aroma of sage fills the air as we travel along the Linyanti River in northern Botswana, near the border with Namibia. We cross the tracks of a honey badger, and in the distance hear the yelping of a pack of African wild dogs in pursuit of an impala. The Linyanti River and adjacent swamps eventually feed into the Chobe River and Chobe National Park. Here, the area is renowned for another, more iconic species: the African savanna elephant, also known as the African bush elephant (Loxodonta africana). Enormous herds constitute one of the last continuous populations on the continent. They migrate 200 kilometers (120 miles) up and down the river system, congregating en masse during the dry season on the Linyanti and Chobe rivers.Savanna elephant numbers are stable in Linyanti and Chobe, currently around 80,000, where most of the region is protected by national parks and private concessions. In all, Botswana is home to 130,000 elephants, Africa’s biggest population of the pachyderms, which in some areas is even growing.About 40 percent of the land in Botswana, a country the size of France, is set aside for conservation through national parks and private reserves. That, together with the fact that former president and conservationist Ian Khama imposed a hunting ban on big game in 2014 and, more controversially, armed rangers with automatic rifles, has made the country a safe haven for elephants and other wildlife.A herd of elephants drinks at the Linyanti River in northern Botswana. Image by Roger Borgelid for Mongabay.But this picture of Botswana as an elephant idyll may soon change. When the new president, Mokgweetsi Masisi, took office in April 2018, he ordered the disarming of the anti-poaching units. The new government has also been pushing to overturn Khama’s hunting ban. It has proposed legislation that would permit the hunting and culling of elephants on the basis that herd populations have become too large in some parts of the country and thereby raise the risks of human-animal conflict.Poaching spreeThen came news from what was supposed to be a routine aerial survey, carried out every four years: the carcasses of 87 elephants, shot with high-caliber arms and with their tusks hacked off, were spotted during the survey in July and August 2018 near the Okavango Delta. It was believed to be one of Africa’s worst mass poaching sprees, according to the conservation organization Elephants Without Borders (EWB), which conducted the survey of northern Botswana together with representatives from the country’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP). Photo evidence was taken to verify that each dead elephant had indeed been poached.EWB submitted its report of the survey to the DWNP in January this year, and on Feb. 24 the government responded, on Twitter, by casting doubt on the methodologies used and the conclusions drawn.PRESS RELEASE REVIEW OF ELEPHANTS WITHOUT BORDERS 2018 DRY SEASON AERIAL SURVEY OF ELEPHANTS AND WILDLIFE IN NORTHERN BOTSWANA REPORT— Botswana Government (@BWGovernment) February 24, 2019The report hasn’t been made public, but a copy seen by Mongabay reveals a significant increase in the poaching rate since the previous aerial survey in 2014. Between 2014 and 2018, the report states, the surveyors observed “a 593 percent increase in estimated numbers of fresh and recent carcasses,” while the number of carcasses observed increased in 40 of 49 surveyed areas. The report also notes that most of the dead elephants were clustered in a few “hotspots” — “exactly the pattern one would expect if poachers are targeting elephants in relatively small areas where the poachers operate.” Nearly all carcasses suspected of being poached were bulls, generally targeted because of their larger tusks.“They showed obvious signs of being poached. I defend what I stated last year,” Mike Chase, the founder of EWB and part of the team that conducted the aerial survey, told Mongabay.But the Botswana government has steadfastly disputed the claim, saying back in 2018 that a “verification mission … established that the majority were not poached but rather died from natural causes and retaliatory killings as a result of human and wildlife conflicts.”Otisitswe Tiroyamodimo, the director of the DWNP, was more blunt in an interview with Mongabay last December.“I wish to make it clear that we have never had 90 carcasses found earlier this year,” he said. “This was pure fabrication of news.“The poaching situation of elephants is that we lose elephants in the northern part of Botswana along our international boundary with Namibia,” he added. “The poaching is sporadic, but due to the density of elephants in the area the opportunity of a kill is always available.”A hacked elephant skull found in northern Botswana. Image by Roger Borgelid for Mongabay.‘Flagship species’In its Twitter statement earlier this month, the Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism said the elephant population from the 2018 survey was “not statistically different from the 2014 survey.” It added that the “only reasonable conclusion” was that the population had remained stable within that period.Yet even beyond the report, evidence of a poaching problem persists. Local newspapers have recently reported a rise in poaching of both elephants and rhinos. The relocation of 130 South African white and black rhinos into remote areas and closely guarded areas of the 3,900-square-kilometer (10,000-square-mile) delta was seen as a success story, until last year when a number of rhinos were poached by what appeared to be a criminal syndicate made up of locals working with Namibian and Zambian citizens. Between January 2018 and January 2019, 13 rhinos were killed.  The Botswana government has deployed anti-poaching teams to protect the rhinos, and private companies are also assisting.Tiroyamodimo said the Botswana government under President Masisi continued to deploy troops to areas prone to poaching. “From suspects arrested or incapacitated during contact with Security Forces, there are Namibian and Zambian citizens, the latter appearing in more numbers,” he said.Asked about the withdrawal of the Khama-era “shoot-to-kill” policy, Tiroyamodimo denied there was ever one.“Automatic weapons were withdrawn from the DWNP [rangers] because of a legislative omission in the act governing the department. Other anti-poaching units being the police, military and intelligence institutions remain fully armed,” he said.Any solution to tackling poaching in Botswana and Africa as a whole needs to be “multifaceted,” he said. “It includes … properly resourcing frontline protection units, involving communities in conservation decision making, allowing communities to benefit from conservation, regional law enforcement collaboration and proper community inclusive elephant conservation strategies. Increasing penalties will also offer deterrence,” he said.But on the essential question of whether poaching is on the rise, Tiroyamodimo remained adamant: “Facts must be put before me to prove that.”Chase of the EWB called for an end to the quibbling over the fate of what he described as the “flagship species” of the African continent.“Stop [arguing] and let’s focus on the elephants. They are being killed,” he said, adding it was important to “secure Botswana’s international reputation” as home to one-third of the continent’s remaining elephants.“If we can’t save the elephants,” he said, “then we cannot save other wildlife either.”Elephants bathe in the Linyanti River at sunset. Image by Roger Borgelid for Mongabay.Banner image of elephants in Botswana’s Linyanti River by Roger Borgelid for Mongabay.Editor’s note: Updated at 5:22 p.m. UTC on 3/12/2019 to more accurately reflect the role of previous government policies in the elephant population increase.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Action-packed opening week ahead for PBA D-League

first_imgThe 2017 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup opens next week with the race to the title as open as it has ever been for the 10 competing teams. The customary opening ceremonies will usher in the new season on January 19 at 2 p.m. at Ynares Sports Arena followed by AMA Online Education’s clash against Province of Batangas at 3 p.m.ADVERTISEMENT Senators think TWG’s move to axe motorcycle taxi pilot run an act of ‘revenge’ LATEST STORIES ‘Old school work ethic’ pays off for immaculate Federer View comments Four teams will be eliminated after the elimination phase, with the top two gaining outright semifinals berth and the middle teams battling in the quarterfinals.The semifinals and Finals will both be contested in a best-of-3 series.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rodgers again falls short of another Super Bowl stint Super Bowl a tossup at legal sports books Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member 15-year-old Gauff stuns Venus anew in first roundcenter_img MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Mahindra rides Paniamogan’s hot hand, frustrates Meralco Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely Senators think TWG’s move to axe motorcycle taxi pilot run an act of ‘revenge’ Action continues the following week, with guest team Blustar Detergent-Malaysia and contender Racal locking horns at 3 p.m. on January 23 followed by the duel between last season’s runners-up Cafe France and Tanduay at 5 p.m.Jose Rizal University makes its season debut on January 24 against Blustar at 3 p.m., before Cignal-San Beda goes up against AMA at 5 p.m.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnA meeting between Victoria Sports-MLQU and Wangs Basketball wrap up the opening week on January 26 at 5 p.m.Other marquee matchups for the conference include the coaching battle between champion mentors Egay Macaraya and Boyet Fernandez when Cafe France plays Cignal on January 30; top picks Teng and Jom Sollano clashing when AMA takes on Racal on February 2; a rematch of last conference’s semifinals tiff between Racal and Tanduay on February 14; and a rematch of last year’s NCAA finalists when San Beda-backed Cignal faces a Racal team bannered by Arellano standouts on March 13. Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respitelast_img read more

Jefferson pours 30 as Alaska stays unbeaten

first_imgPalace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Calvin Abueva added 17 markers, six boards, and two assists, while Sonny Thoss got 11 points and two rebounds in the win as their side moved to a 3-0 card.“Good start. Cory got going early and it helps when your import’s on fire early,” said coach Alex Compton.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnJames White and Mark Yee, though, kept the Floodbuster in the game as they got to as close as five, 87-82, with 4:15 to play, but Thoss anchored Alaska’s 10-0 response to once again take a 97-82 edge in the final 1:47.“Sonny came in and he played like his young self. He got points, he got rebounds for us while Cory is resting on the bench. I thought that stretch with Cory out, the guys did a great job,” said Compton. Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties PBA IMAGESCory Jefferson commandeered the early barrage for Alaska as it held off pesky Mahindra, 98-92, and nabbed its third win in the 2017 PBA Commissioner’s Cup Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.The high-scoring import was at it again, firing 26 of his 30 points in the first half while hauling down 11 rebounds as the Aces established early control and led by as much as 18 in the third period.ADVERTISEMENT Duterte promises to look for funds to establish rail transport in Cebu Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘1917’ takes top honor at the Producers Guild Awards ‘It’s not my shame’: Why Filipino women are calling out sexual misconduct on social media ‘Bad Boys for Life’ debuts so good with box office top spot MOST READ LATEST STORIES Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town White topped Mahindra (1-3) with 30 points, 14 rebounds, and three blocks, while Yee had 13 markers and four boards.The Scores:ALASKA 98 – Jefferson 30, Abueva 17, Thoss 11, Cruz 8, Racal 8, Enciso 6, Exciminiano 5, Galliguez 5, Andrada 2, Casio 2, Mendoza 2, Pascual 2, Magat 0.MAHINDRA 92 – White 30, Yee 13, Revilla 12, David 10, Mallari 7, Celda 5, Paniamogan 5, Ballesteros 2, Elorde 2, Galanza 2, Guevarra 2, Teng 2, Caperal 0, Deutchman 0, Salva 0.Quarters: 28-18, 50-40, 74-61, 98-92.ADVERTISEMENT Fellow Atenean nabbed over leak of Ravena’s lewd photos Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR View commentslast_img read more

Jay Washington gets All-Star nod

first_imgPalace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Duterte’s ‘soft heart’ could save ABS-CBN, says election lawyer Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ Jay Washington. PBA IMAGESLUCENA — Luzon All-Stars continue to look more formidable with the addition of Jay Washington to its lineup.The veteran forward from Rain or Shine was chosen as the replacement for Marc Pingris, who is still out due to a hip injury.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot deadcenter_img Aguilar not taking chances in bid to make Gilas team Bulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte Also in the team are Arwind Santos, Ranidel de Ocampo, Mark Caguioa, Alex Cabagnot, LA Tenorio, Marcio Lassiter, and Stanley Pringle.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Washington, whose mother hails from San Antonio, Zambales, will be making his fourth All-Star appearance on Friday when the PBA studs take on Gilas Pilipinas at Quezon Convention Center here.Pingris led the list for Luzon as he placed first with 11,079 votes to earn his spot among the starters.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnHowever, the energetic Star forward has yet to see action this 2017 PBA Commissioner’s Cup and will be missing when the festivities roll on in Quezon on Friday.Coach Leo Austria has yet to decide on who will take the fifth spot among the starters who will join Calvin Abueva, Japeth Aguilar, Paul Lee, and Jayson Castro. LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Tony Romo to try qualifying for US Open

first_imgView comments LIST: Jan. 20 class suspensions due to Taal Volcano eruption Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Tony Romo. APALEDO, Texas — Tony Romo’s next pursuit of a championship will be in golf.And it’s a long shot.ADVERTISEMENT Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ LATEST STORIES Bulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar A month after the Dallas Cowboys quarterback retired, Romo is among nearly 9,500 players who signed up for the U.S. Open. He plays an 18-hole local qualifier Monday (Tuesday Manila time) at Split Rail Links and Golf Club about 30 minutes west of Fort Worth.If he advances, the next step is sectional qualifying on June 5 to get into the U.S. Open at Erin Hills in Wisconsin.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnThis isn’t the first time Romo has tried to qualify. He made it out of local qualifying in 2010. In a 36-hole sectional qualifier where only two of the 35 players advanced, Romo opened with a 71 and withdrew in the afternoon after two weather delays.Orville Moody in 1969 was the last player to go through local qualifying and win the U.S. Open.center_img Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Boston sports struggle with perception built on racist past Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENR Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot deadlast_img read more