Labor issues loom for Alaska Airlines-Virgin America merger

first_imgBusiness | TransportationLabor issues loom for Alaska Airlines-Virgin America mergerApril 27, 2017 by Tom Banse, Northwest News Network Share:(Photo by Alaska Airlines/Virgin America)Audio Playerhttps://cpa.ds.npr.org/northwestnews/audio/2017/04/042617TB_Tilden_web.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Unionized pilots at Alaska Airlines and recently acquired Virgin America pulled off a virtual barrel roll Wednesday to get management’s attention.The union complains that talks to combine both pilot groups under what they hope will be a more generous joint contract aren’t moving fast enough.The Air Line Pilots Association blasted out a statement during the middle of an Alaska Air Group quarterly earnings conference call.“It’s time for Alaska management to show that they are committed to their guiding principles and to their pilots,” part of the statement read.CEO Brad Tilden came on the line with Wall Street analysts and media to respond.“Things are changing in the industry,” Tilden said. “I think they’re changing at Alaska with this merger. Things are moving fast. So expectations are changing. I think people are a little more on edge. We’re showing signs of that. That’s what is going on right now.”Tilden said one thing that hasn’t changed is the value his company places on a good working relationship with its labor unions. Tilden insisted during the earnings call that the integration of Virgin America “continues to progress well.”The pilots’ union and Alaska Airlines resume negotiations with help of a mediator next month.Seattle-based Alaska Air Group reported Wednesday solid earnings for the first quarter of 2017.Profits were lower compared with the same quarter a year ago because of higher fuel prices and costs related to its merger with Virgin America.Share this story:last_img read more

Without otter predation, sea urchins decimate Aleutian reefs

first_imgAlaska’s Energy Desk | Aleutians | EnvironmentWithout otter predation, sea urchins decimate Aleutian reefsOctober 5, 2020 by Hope McKenney, Alaska’s Energy Desk – Unalaska Share:Sea urchins dine on a reef in the Aleutian Islands. Urchins, which boomed after sea otters disappeared, destroyed many kelp forests on the reefs and are now eating the algae-filled reefs that have been weakened by ocean acidification. (J. Tomoleoni / U.S. Geological Survey)Sea urchins are devouring the massive limestone reefs surrounding the central and western Aleutian Islands — a process exacerbated by climate-driven changes in the marine environment, according to a new study published in Science.In Unalaska, the largest community in the 1,200-mile Aleutian archipelago, rich kelp beds and curious otters line the island’s shores.“We’re pretty lucky here — especially in Unalaska Bay — we have a very healthy and, what appears to be, growing sea otter population which is able to keep the sea urchins in check,” said Melissa Good, the local marine advisory agent with Alaska Sea Grant.According to Good, there are two healthy sea otter populations in the Aleutian Islands — in Unalaska Bay and in Clam Lagoon in Adak. She said the reason the population is healthy in Unalaska is that the otters are protected from orcas due to the infrastructure from the multi-billion dollar fishing industry.“We see the sea otters swimming around and hanging out, sleeping in the kelp reefs right here in Unalaska Bay, especially in the inner harbor areas which means that orcas are not likely to come in and predate on them,” Good said. “They have protection.”But in other parts of the central and western Aleutians — starting west of Samalga Pass and the Islands of Four Mountains — a sharp decline in the otter population from killer whale predation starting in the 1990s has led to a boom in sea urchins, according to Brenda Konar, a professor of marine biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Sea otters are the primary natural predators of sea urchins. (Photo courtesy J. Tomoleoni / U.S. Geological Survey)Konar says the theory is that killer whales used to eat many of the “great whales,” 13 extremely large Cetacean species. But as many of the great whale species were hunted down, killer whales were forced to switch their prey. So they switched from eating whales to eating Steller sea lions, fur seals and harbor seals, and continued down the marine mammal food chain until they eventually got to sea otters.In the central and western Aleutians, the otter populations plummeted.Now uncontrolled by sea otters, their natural predator — the urchin population — boomed both in body size and density.“The sea urchins can be ridiculously dense,” Konar said. “In a 3-foot by 3-foot section, you can find 400 of these urchins just sitting there, trying to eat away at the kelp.”Those sea urchins, which are “tremendous grazers” according to Konar, began eating more kelp that grows on the reefs, decimating the vast kelp forests that went on for miles in the Aleutian archipelago.“And so now you’ve lost the habitat that organisms were normally coming into and living there, reproducing there and eating there,” said Good. “You can think of seaweed-like plants on land as the base of the food web. And so when you have a lot of seaweed out there, you also have a lot of food. And so when you completely get rid of that you’ve eliminated the space for other animals. You have basically clear cut the forest of the sea.”Having decimated the kelp, urchins are now eating Clathromorphum nereostratum, the algae that create the reefs.“So first, the kelp forests disappeared,” said Konar. “Now, the reef underneath the kelp forest is disappearing.”Konar began diving in the Aleutians in the 1990s, just as the Aleutian sea otter population began to crash. She is also a co-author of the new study in Science about what’s happening to Aleutian reefs.“And what’s happening is, it’s not just that there’s a lot of sea urchins out there eating and digging away at these coralline biogenic habitats, but it’s also that the warming temperature and ocean acidification is weakening these coralline plants and making it even easier for the sea urchins to erode them away,” Konar said.The research shows that sea urchin grazing has become much more lethal in recent years due to the emergent effects of climate change, according to Doug Rasher, a senior research scientist at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Maine and lead author of the study.Large urchins are chomping away at a faster rate than the algae can grow.“Ocean warming and acidification are making it difficult for calcifying organisms to produce their shells — in this case, the algae’s protective skeleton. This critical species has now become highly vulnerable to urchin grazing, right as urchin abundance is peaking. It’s a devastating combination,” Rasher said.In some places, reefs that are meters thick and thousands of years old are crumbling from urchins burrowing through the weakened calcium carbonate structures.“These coral reefs live hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years,” Konar said. “And so if they’re being eroded as much as they are in just a couple of years, and it takes them a few hundred years to regrow that amount, even if everything stopped today and the otters came back,  the urchins got eaten up and everything became rosy again, it would take these coralline crusts a really long time to come back.”Despite Konar’s uncertainty, Rasher said their study indicates that restoring sea otters to the central and western Aleutians would result in a decline in sea urchins and the recovery of kelp forests.Share this story:last_img read more

Premium / Supply chain radar: MSC to take over Atlantic Forwarding as stress builds in the supply chain

first_img Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Forgotten your password? Please click here © Yorgy67 Email* By Alessandro Pasetti 28/11/2018 Premium subscriber LOGIN “Our corporate purpose is long-term success, which we achieve through extensive organic growth. In this way, we provide security and stability for our employees and fulfil the needs of our corporate clients for innovative and unique products and services” – Atlantic Forwarding Group, Schlieren, SwitzerlandA few days ago I delved into Kuehne + Nagel’s growing portfolio of receivables, aware of growing nervousness among my supply chain sources, many of whom have talked of a higher degree of stress in the daily love affairs between logistic companies and ocean carriers.On … Password*center_img Email* New Premium subscriber REGISTER LOGIN Reset Your Password Reset << Go back Please Loginlast_img read more

I was Brutally Beaten for Trying to Help a Friend

first_img News SHARE News I was Brutally Beaten for Trying to Help a Friend Facebook Twitter Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest By Daily NK – 2005.10.27 2:36pm center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China News AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] News In the autumn, with most of the strenuous root collection work having been completed, we were given firewood work. We were instructed to carry 20~30 kilograms of firewood to school, some three kilometers, six times a day. We did not have any wood-carrying equipment. When I put the first load on my shoulder and moved a few steps, I already felt my shoulder breaking and my feet shaking. I had to stop three or four times on the way before I reached school.When I finished my 4th round and started on my way back to work, I saw my friend, Wung-Mo, lying on the ground motionless. I approached him and tried to wake him up. “Hey, Wung-Mo, get up. Quick! They will beat you to death if they find out.” I tried to help him up with my arms under his arm pits. He didn’t move. He couldn’t even talk. I pushed his load of firewood aside, pulled him under a tree nearby and laid him down comfortably.Suddenly, I felt the strong blow of a stick on my back. “Who told you to help him?” It was the teacher. Even before I was able to get up, I was hit several more times. “You s.o.b. You better get back to work.” I rolled over to escape his beatings, then I saw him beginning to mercilessly kick at my friend. “I know you are cheating .Get up!” The boy did not move.The days were getting colder and we were instructed to hurry up with our firewood work. The oldest boys were given the work of cutting down trees high up in the mountain, the second group of boys cutting down the trees to right size with saws, the third group carrying the wood down to the foot of the mountain and the youngest boys carrying the short wood to school.Another boy fell on his fifth round. I tried very hard to finish my work because if I did not accomplish my work quota, the other boys would have to do more work. I did not want them to think I was not strong enough. But, I could not take it anymore and I fell into a ditch near my school on the 6th round. The whole world looked yellow to me. I felt so weak without any strength in my trembling feet, before I finally fainted. When I woke up some time later, I saw that three other boys had fainted like I did.The other boys were angry with us because they had to do more work under the collective work quota system. As the boys passed by us, one of them said. “Hey, don’t try to be smart, eh?” Others joined, “Don’t you know it is also as difficult for us as it was for you? We do it so why don’t you?” They all spat angry words at us. I could not blame them.First, I was angry with my grandfather because I was suffering from all these hardships because of him. Then, I asked, “What was his sin anyway?” They say he betrayed the fatherland and people. But, how? I don’t know any details of his sin. Then, I came to wonder, “Why am I punished because of his crime, anyway?” I could not understand. Why… why… why?last_img read more

International community turns attention towards NK overseas workers

first_img Ordinary Pyongyang residents have not received government rations since mid-April Facebook Twitter News News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR North Korean workers in transit at Russia’s Vladivostok airport. Image: Daily NK -We’ve heard that dispatched workers have better access to foreign media than people in North Korea. As a result, do you think more foreign workers will try to defect? As long as Kim Jong Un continues to use the politics of fear and overseas workers continue to be exploited, I think that those workers who can access foreign information will continue to make defection attempts. Most of the foreign workers have lived through North Korea’s famine period (in the mid 1990s), so they have more interest in self preservation than they have loyalty towards the regime. The collectivist ethos and patriotism are fading in North Korea. If suppression and exploitation continue, the likelihood of defections will rise. -When overseas workers defect, they often maintain relations with friends and relatives still in North Korea. What kind of influence do they have on North Korean society?  The North Korean authorities will not inform the public that overseas workers are defecting, but the workers themselves will use secret forms of communication to let people know. As rumors spread inside the country about the growing number of defecting workers, public opinion will change. There is also the chance that North Korea will tighten its grip on these workers. That means the screening process will become incredibly strict, ensuring only loyal residents have the chance to work abroad. If that happens, the overall number of workers will likely drop. That means that the number of defectors will also drop. -What role can South Korea and the international community play in terms of influencing these overseas workers? Do you think it is important to conduct more outreach? If more North Korean workers are dispatched abroad, more will defect. Also, the more foreign information and culture that they come into contact with, the greater the effect it will have on them. The consumption of foreign ideas and information helps them to put their own experience in context, and reveals that conditions are better in other countries. This will stir the pot, leading to further disillusionment and defections. That is why I believe it is not the best course of action to dramatically reduce the number of overseas workers. Instead, I think that the experience that these laborers get while abroad is extremely important in terms of producing positive change within North Korean society. So I think we need to work with the ILO and host countries to ensure that the working conditions are brought up to international standards. The international community has developed considerable interest in North Korea’s overseas workers, but this is still a priority for South Korea as well. We need to show interest in improving human rights for North Korea’s workers in order to lay the groundwork for reunification. It seems as if there are some responses inside North Korea to this constant stream of pressure and criticism from the international community. For instance, there have been some slight formal changes to the North Korean constitution and criminal law codes. I think it is South Korea’s duty to lead the charge when it comes to North Korean human rights and the overseas labor problem.  By Daily NK – 2016.11.07 5:49pm SHARE AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] International community turns attention towards NK overseas workers -The lengths that North Korean overseas laborers go to in order to escape is testament to the horrendous treatment they receive at the hands of the North Korean authorities. The miserable conditions that North Korean workers are subject to abroad have been well documented, and they are frequently subject to human rights violations. In recent months, the international community has been renewing its efforts to bring this issue to the fore.    A special investigation by the South Korean government [under the auspice of the recently-passed North Korean Human Rights Act] will be held on November 17 and is tasked with investigating the scale of the problem, the conditions under which the workers live, and the manner in which the North Korean regime controls its workers. To learn more about the issue, we sat down with Jeon Hyeon Jun, Director of the Northeast Asia Peace and Cooperation Institute.The severe human rights abuses that North Korean overseas laborers are subjected to is getting more attention from the international community. In late August this year, a group said to consist of more than ten North Korean workers in Russia succeeded in a group defection by heading to the South Korean consulate general and seeking asylum. We have heard that the escapees are currently on their way to South Korea. Can you tell us a little more about this? That is correct. We have been informed that over ten North Korean laborers fled from Saint Petersburg, Russia, this August. We heard that the team manager led the defection, and that the escapees received assistance from an international human rights organization which facilitated their evacuation to a local safe zone. They are expected to land in South Korea soon. The South Korean government has been involved in facilitating their transport as well. We believe that the workers were assigned to a construction site under the auspices of the “Mokran” North Korean construction company, which employs approximately 150 workers in the region. -How many overseas North Korean laborers are there? We don’t have precise figures. We believe anywhere from 60,000 to 120,000. It is possible that as many as 200,000 are dispatched abroad. -What function do these workers serve for the regime? The North Korean regime needs foreign currency. They have previously engaged in munitions sales, sales of illicit drugs, and counterfeiting to earn cash, but these enterprises are not as successful these days. So the regime has turned to exporting its people to earn cash. It is assumed that the regime accepts the fact that a minority of the workers will defect, and has deemed this an acceptable risk. -We’ve heard that North Korean overseas workers live in terrible conditions. Can you elaborate on this? They reportedly work for approximately 12 to 16 hours per day. The fixed work shift is 8 hours, but this is extended to increase revenue for the regime. They are also forced to work on weekends, and the abysmal conditions really are a form of slave labor. They are paid $1,000 a month in some instances, but 90% of that is confiscated by the state in the form of forced bribes and so-called “loyalty funds.” The remaining sum is often sent home to the family, so the workers have a very difficult time making ends meet. They have very little freedom to move about, and if they do go out, they must go in pairs and are held responsible for their partner. -Such harsh conditions no doubt contribute to many of the workers contemplating defection. Can you tell us a bit more about the recent Russian group defection? That is absolutely correct. The reasons that they defect include lack of freedom, the difficulty of the work, health problems, and the terrible working conditions. The fact that such a large proportion of their paycheck goes to the regime is another major source of frustration. The workers are also forced to contribute to various other causes. For example, they were subject to a compulsory donation of $100-150 for the Tumen flood relief effort. These kinds of practices cause a lot of grief among the workers. Furthermore, once the workers are abroad, they have more access to information than they have ever had. In particular, each team leader has a cellphone, making it quite easy for them to access foreign media. We’ve learned that Russian police are not very keen on apprehending North Koreans. The recent defection from Russia involved a team of workers, and it’s likely that the team leader decided to defect because he was worried that he would be blamed for something. Since 2012, it appears that the regime has not done a very good job of vetting candidates for foreign work. Normally, those sent abroad are supposed to be ideologically pure, but it appears that people are now able to bribe their way into these overseas labor programs. -The fact that ten workers defected as a group is pretty remarkable. Logistically, it must have been quite difficult for them to organize and communicate. How do you think they managed to succeed? The fact that the team leader accompanied the group is an important element to this. The team leader has access to information and language skills. He also has access to the team members’ passports. A team leader was also involved in the group defection in China that occurred in April. -Recently, the U.S. and the international community has been focusing attention on foreign laborers more than ever before. What is drawing this interest? The list is long. It includes the poor conditions, the forced labor, and the human rights abuses. The fact that the regime is repossessing their wages is also an object of contention for the international community, because there have been a number of reports indicating that the regime is using these funds to help finance its weapons of mass destruction. That is why there are an increasing number of people voicing the need to regulate or limit the number of foreign workers. -Have you noticed any significant changes as a result of this attention from the global community? Countries all over the world – including Russia, Nepal, Malta and Tanzania – are importing North Korean laborers. The following governments have recently deported North Korean workers: Malta (10 workers), Russia (14), and Nepal (53). Tanzania recently closed two North Korean hospitals that were selling fake medicines to patients. By refusing to extend visas and re-sign contracts, these governments are effectively deporting workers and cancelling programs. Since North Korea is not a member of the International Labor Organization (ILO) or other international bodies, it is difficult to target the government directly with sanctions. So instead, the international community has been approaching the host countries and highlighting the terrible working conditions that the workers are subject to. -The South Korean government said that it will release a report on human rights abuses of North Korean overseas workers. Do you think this report will have any effect? North Korea is very much aware of the international community’s actions. After years of pointing out these shortfalls and criticizing these abuses, it appears that North Korea is coming under pressure. Our strategy is to continue to emphasize the abhorrent conditions and hope that governments with the power to make a difference will take heed. With this strategy in mind, the newly created Center for Investigation & Documentation on Human Rights in North Korea will begin its operations. It was created under the South Korean government’s North Korean Human Rights Act. The center will research and record human rights violations against North Korean residents and overseas workers alike. The government has specifically stated that overseas workers will be reported on. In doing so, South Korea is seeking to align with the international community and bring about lasting change. Our Foreign Affairs Minister Yun Byung Se has strongly argued that North Korea’s use of foreign labor is tantamount to human rights abuse. It will be too challenging to investigate all of these sites directly, so I think for the road ahead we will need to partner with the host countries in order to conduct this research. -What is the preferred methodology for this kind of research? We need to partner with the governments who are using North Korean labor and consult with NGOs. We need to find out how the workers are being treated, whether they are being exploited, and how they are being paid. We need to work towards a system in which the workers are paid directly. It would also be ideal if their work sites were monitored by police and regulated by agencies to ensure a safe workplace and humane treatment in accordance with international labor laws. All of these efforts require diplomatic coordination.  Daily NK’s special correspondence team traveled to the Ussuriysk region near Vladivostok, Russia, and found North Korean laborers hard at work at a construction site. Image: Daily NK Hamhung man arrested for corruption while working at a state-run department store News News North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only)last_img read more

OSC will limit evidence at NSI sanctions hearing

first_img PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case James Langton In place of the IIROC panel’s sanctions, the OSC will now hold a hearing of its own, “solely on the question of the appropriate sanctions and costs to be imposed … based on the findings of the IIROC panel”. That hearing is now slated to start in June. On Wednesday, the OSC said it has granted a motion from IIROC that will exclude certain affidavits filed by Alboini and NSI from evidence at the forthcoming hearing.The commission also ordered that certain witnesses can only testify to the character of Alboini, and their satisfaction in their dealings with Alboini and NSI; and, it said that Alboini’s testimony at the hearing must be limited to the matters described in the commission’s oral reasons, which were given at a motions hearing on May 12. In addition to the order limiting that evidence, it ordered IIROC to file its materials in the case by May 30; that Alboini and NSI must file their response by June 4; and, that IIROC file any reply to that by June 6. BFI investors plead for firm’s sale Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator Keywords EnforcementCompanies Northern Securities Inc., Ontario Securities Commission center_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The Ontario Securities Commission has granted a motion from the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) that will limit the evidence that Northern Securities Inc. (NSI), and the firm’s CEO, Vic Alboini, can give at a hearing to consider new sanctions stemming from an IIROC disciplinary decision. Last December, the OSC set aside certain sanctions imposed on Alboini and NSI by IIROC and ordered that it would hold a new hearing to consider appropriate sanctions in the case. In that decision, the OSC found that the IIROC panel made an error of law, and it ruled that it was unfair for the IIROC panel to proceed with a sanctions hearing before it had issued its reasons in the original hearing on the merits of the case. (See Investment Executive, OSC extends stay of Northern penalties, February 21, 2013.) Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

IIAC’s new resource centre to help firms manage cyber risks

first_img “The prevailing expert opinion is that eventually, all firms will be subject to some sort of cybersecurity incident,” says the IIAC’s welcome message on its resource centre webpage. “The potential for serious financial, operational and reputational damage from a cyber attack is becoming recognized as a critical risk that must be managed at the highest levels of an organization.” This is especially important for financial services firms, which are targeted at high rates, according to the IIAC. Reasons for this include firms’ direct and indirect access to financial assets; sensitive client information; information about potential and current transactions; and trading data and algorithms. The resource centre includes features such as a guidebook that reviews the components of a strong cybersecurity strategy, including governance and risk management, risk assessment and staff training. IIAC members will find material that provides simple explanations on issues such as creating a secure password and detecting a phishing email. There is also access to research on the topic from organizations such as U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s (FINRA) and the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), the U.S. securities industry association. The resource centre can be found at http://iiac.ca/resources/cyber-security/. Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Information security,  CybersecurityCompanies Investment Industry Association of Canada Tessie Sanci Facebook LinkedIn Twittercenter_img Desjardins Group says 2019 theft of 4.2 million members’ data cost $108 million The Toronto-based Investment Industry Association of Canada (IIAC) has launched its online cybersecurity resource centre with the aim of helping financial services firms increase their “cyber resilience.” Although even a robust cybersecurity program will not eliminate all cyber risks, it will increase a firm’s cyber resilience, which is defined as the ability to manage these risks, the IIAC states in a message posted on its website. This has led to the IIAC’s current collection of materials intended to guide firms through the development and maintenance of a strong program. IIROC urges vigilance amid heightened cybersecurity threats Court approves data breach settlements with BMO, CIBClast_img read more

Corwin Beverage employee named to PepsiCo Chairman’s Ring of Honor

first_img guestLabel guestLabel Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). Corwin Beverage employee named to PepsiCo Chairman’s Ring of HonorPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Tuesday, August 13, 2019in: Business, Community Newsshare 0 Dustin Meyer joined Corwin Beverage in 2012 after gaining work experience locally and attended Clark College and Ridgefield High School RIDGEFIELD — Corwin Beverage team member Dustin Meyer is the person responsible for assuring that Corwin Beverage products are stocked and prominently displayed at large grocery stores across southwest Washington.Corwin Beverage employee named to PepsiCo Chairman’s Ring of HonorDustin Meyer joined Corwin Beverage in 2012 after gaining work experience locally and attended Clark College and Ridgefield High School. Photo courtesy of Corwin Beverage CompanyHe is now recognized as among the best globally by PepsiCo.Meyer’s sales and customer service performance earned him a place in the 2019 Pepsico Chairman’s Ring of Honor, recognition reserved for just one out of every 1,000 front line sales associates globally.“Dustin Meyers’ client service dedication, passion for excellence and sales determination has long been appreciated by clients and fellow team members. His achievements are now commemorated by the Chairman of PepsiCo,” said Keith Richards, CEO of Corwin Beverage.Meyer and his spouse Yulya joined 200 honorees across the globe at a conference in New York City hosted by Pepsico Chairman Ramon Laguarta, including a tour of PepsiCo headquarters in Purchase, New York.Meyer supports large format stores for Corwin Beverage after earlier roles in merchandising and warehouse operations. He joined Corwin Beverage in 2012 after gaining work experience locally and attended Clark College and Ridgefield High School.Meyer is the fifth sales team member from Corwin Beverage to be named to the Chairman’s Ring of Honor. Prior winners included; Trey Klug (2016), Nate Herbst (2011), John Hartney (2010) and Vic Oenning (2006). Shaun Nelson won a related award for operations in 2010.The Chairman’s Ring of Honor program is in its 21st year to advance the Pepsi vision of becoming the global leader in convenience foods and beverages by winning with purpose. PepsiCo products are enjoyed one billion times each day by people in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. PepsiCo’s beverage and food portfolio includes Frito-Lay, Gatorade, Pepsi-Cola, Quaker and Tropicana.Corwin Beverage Company is a fourth generation family-owned business that has sold beverages in Southwest Washington since 1941. From a single truck and three employees, the family expanded Corwin Beverage to a fleet of more than 100 trucks and 140 employees, distributing beverages and food products throughout the Portland-Vancouver region. Its product distribution includes more than 300 beverage and food items, including Pepsi products, beer and wine through Kendall’s Craft Beverages, convenience foods through Crave Fresh MicroMarkets, and coffee services under the Revolt brand. More information is available at www.corwinbevco.com.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyRidgefieldshare 0 Previous : Woodland Public Schools offers help to parents and students for the start of the school year Next : Thirteen file to fill Vancouver School Board vacancyAdvertisementThis is placeholder text 1 CommentOldest Newest Most Voted Inline FeedbacksView all commentscenter_img Name*Email*Website I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree Name*Email*Websitelast_img read more

Refurbished Liguanea Post Office Internet Café Re-opened

first_imgRefurbished Liguanea Post Office Internet Café Re-openedJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Refurbished Liguanea Post Office Internet Café Re-opened TechnologyOctober 12, 2014Written by: O. Rodger Hutchinson Residents of Liguanea and its environs, in St. Andrew, now have improved internet access at the Liguanea Post Office, where the service and other related activities have been upgraded at a cost over $200,000 by the LIME Foundation.The upgrading entailed the provision of additional computers and software, and network accessories; a printer; and furniture; as well as general refurbishment of the internet café.Users of the facility are now better able to surf the internet, and send and receive e-mails; as well as copy, scan, photocopy, and print documents. A key feature of the provisions will be significant low user rates for senior citizens.The undertaking resulted from a renewal of the public/private partnership between telecommunications provider, LIME, and the Postal Corporation of Jamaica.Speaking at the facility’s official opening on World Postal Day, Thursday, October 9, Science, Technology, Energy, and Mining Minister, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, described the venture as a “significant investment.”“It is good when you can come into a post office and…with the click of a mouse, instead of sending a registered mail, you send an e-mail to (your) friends and families wherever they are, and wait for an instant response. We believe that access to data services and the internet are of paramount importance,” he stated.For his part, Postal Corporation of Jamaica Board Chairman, Lance Hylton, said the café’s re-opening is one of the strategies being undertaken to expand the agency’s services.“Now more Jamaicans will have access to shop on-line and have their items delivered by the post. For small business persons and the self-employed, they can easily use these services to support their own economic activities,” he said.Chief Executive Officer of LIME, Garfield Sinclair, noted that the Liguanea Post Office project forms part of the company’s mission to deliver 100 per cent internet connectivity to the Jamaicans, within the shortest time possible.He said approximately $11 billion is currently being spent under the firm’s Mobile Network Upgrade and Expansion Programme, and Broadband Expansion Project, to achieve this target.“Small but effective projects, like the Ligunea Post Office ‘Link’, are part of that bold mission. ‘The Link’ will help to close the smaller gaps that will complete the overall connectivity picture. Our vision is to establish increased touch-points for children and adults who are still not able to access to the Internet with relative ease,” he pointed out.Mr. Sinclair said the Liguanea Post Office café is the third ‘Link’ facility which the LIME Foundation had opened over the past 12 months, adding that two others are scheduled to be opened soon.State Minister for Science, Technology, Energy, and Mining and Member of Parliament for South East St. Andrew, where the facility is located, Hon. Julian Robinson, noted that with significantly lower rates and benefits to seniors, the post office becomes an attractive option for them and other persons to use. RelatedBusiness Owner Saves Big from Solar System Advertisementscenter_img Story HighlightsThe upgrading entailed the provision of additional computers and software, and network accessories; a printer; and furniture; as well as general refurbishment of the internet café.Chief Executive Officer of LIME, Garfield Sinclair, noted that the Liguanea Post Office project forms part of the company’s mission to deliver 100 per cent internet connectivity to the Jamaicans, within the shortest time possible.Mr. Sinclair said the Liguanea Post Office café is the third ‘Link’ facility which the LIME Foundation had opened over the past 12 months, adding that two others are scheduled to be opened soon. RelatedSolar Energy for All Companies in Guardsman Group Photo: JIS PhotographerScience, Technology, Energy, and Mining Minister, Hon. Phillip Paulwell (2nd left), performs the symbolic ribbon cutting exercise to formally re-open the newly upgraded Liguanea Post Office internet café, in St. Andrew on October 9. The facility was refurbished at a cost of over $200,000 by the LIME Foundation, under a public/private partnership between the Postal Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ), and telecommunications firm, LIME. Also participating in the proceedings were, from left, – LIME Chief Executive Officer, Garfield Sinclair; LIME Foundation Chairman, Errol Miller; State Minister for Science, Technology, Energy, and Mining and Member of Parliament for South East St. Andrew, where the facility is located, Hon. Julian Robinson; Postal Corporation of Jamaica Board Chairman, Lance Hylton; and Post Master General, Michael Gentles. RelatedUS$6 Million Invested in BPO Facility in Portmorelast_img read more

COJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual Returns

first_imgCOJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual ReturnsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: Mark BellChief Executive Officer of the Companies Office of Jamaica, Judith Ramlogan (centre), gives details of the two-month amnesty that the entity will be undertaking May 4 to June 30, 2015, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on April 23. Looking on are: Customer Service Manager, Inger Hainsley-Bennett (left) and Deputy CEO, Shellie Leon. COJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual Returns CommerceApril 24, 2015Written by: Kadian Brown FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Advertisements Story HighlightsThe Companies Office of Jamaica (COJ) will be embarking on a two-month amnesty to facilitate the filing of outstanding annual returns; removal of companies and closure of business names from its register.The amnesty will last from May 4 to June 30, 2015.CEO of the COJ, Judith Ramlogan, explained that the amnesty will allow companies limited by shares (company formed to make a profit) to file each outstanding annual return at a cost of $3,000, down from $5,000 or 60 per cent of the regular cost.center_img RelatedIndustry Ministry Strengthening Institutional Capacity RelatedGov’t to Sign US$5 Billion Logistics Hub MoU Monday RelatedMore Women in the Workforce Will Grow the Economy – Ffolkes Abrahams The Companies Office of Jamaica (COJ) will be embarking on a two-month amnesty to facilitate the filing of outstanding annual returns; removal of companies and closure of business names from its register.The amnesty will last from May 4 to June 30, 2015.Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on April 23, Chief Executive Officer of the COJ, Judith Ramlogan, explained that the amnesty will allow companies limited by shares (company formed to make a profit) to file each outstanding annual return at a cost of $3,000, down from $5,000 or 60 per cent of the regular cost.“There is a penalty of $100 charged for each day that the annual return is outstanding up to a maximum of $10,000…the amnesty will allow for this penalty charge to be waived, so companies will not have to pay the penalty,” Mrs. Ramlogan pointed out.Companies limited by guarantee or non-profit companies, will file annual returns at a cost of $1,000 each or 50 per cent of the regular cost.For the amnesty period, companies may be removed from the register for a flat fee of $10,000 without having to file all outstanding documents or provide an audit certificate. There will be no late fees, penalties, removal or advertising fee charged as would have been the case prior to the amnesty.“The amnesty offers persons who own business names that have been registered but never renewed to close those business names for a flat fee of $2,000,” the CEO pointed out, adding that “usually, if you have a business name that has never been renewed and you want to close that business name, you would have to pay all outstanding renewal fees, but this amnesty allow you to request removal or closure and pay a fee of $2,000 with no late or renewal fees charged.”Highlighting the challenges which led to the decision for the amnesty, Mrs. Ramlogan outlined that as at December 2014, there were 86,994 companies on the Companies Register with 51,755 or 59.5 per cent of that number being delinquent.“More than half of the companies on the Register have failed to file one or more documents with the Registrar of Companies,” she highlighted.The CEO noted too, that up to December 2014, 125,846 Business Names had been registered by the Companies Office and of that number, 80,424 had expired, but had never been renewed or closed.She pointed out that in addition to the significant reduction in cost during the amnesty period, companies and businesses will get the opportunity to become compliant.“The amnesty will benefit Jamaica in general as there will be a more accurate and current companies register and for the businesses, if you are compliant, there are benefits such as gaining easier access to financing, as banks do not deal with companies that are not compliant,” she added.last_img read more