Facebook considered investing in China’s Xiaomi

first_img Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 13 JAN 2015 Previous ArticleOrange CEO says French consolidation could follow EE saleNext ArticleKabel shareholder calls for review of Vodafone sale Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Xiaomi CEO Lei Jun discussed the possibility of the social media giant investing in the smartphone maker in October, but nothing substantial came of it, Reuters has reported.“Facebook wants to get into China, and Xiaomi is keen to expand outside, so they both recognise the importance of working together,” a source said, although the figure discussed was said to be “not huge”.The dinner in Beijing where the talks took place was held ahead of Xiaomi’s round of funding in which it raised $1.1 billion, which it claims values the firm at $45 billion. Last week, the company reported a 135% increase in sales in 2014 to $12.1 billion.Facebook, along with Google and Twitter, is currently banned in China and Lei may have been worried about the political fallout that would result from such a deal.Another concern could be how an agreement with Facebook would impact Xiaomi’s relations with Google, on whose operating system its phones are made.However, Xiaomi could benefit from access to Facebook’s user data which would allow it to grow and provide comprehensive online services.As for Facebook, a deal would give it a new channel to distribute its apps and Xiaomi could prove to be a key ally in trying to overturn the ban in a country with a population of around 1.35 billion.While politician Lu Wei, China’s top internet censor, has maintained that social media is a destabilising force, he visited Facebook headquarters in the US last month, which has sparked speculation that Facebook’s relations with the Chinese government could be taking a turn for the better. Saleha Riaz Xiaomi off the hook in the US Saleha joined Mobile World Live in October 2014 as a reporter and works across all e-newsletters – creating content, writing blogs and reports as well as conducting feature interviews…More Read more Ericsson warns over loss of China market share Tags Home Facebook considered investing in China’s Xiaomi Xiaomi smartphone surge bears fruits Related ChinaFacebookFinancialRegulatoryXiaomilast_img read more

In Craven County

first_imgWith its rich history and cultural offerings, along with the beauty of its rivers and surrounding region, living in Craven County means having the best of both worlds: the quaintness of a Southern small town and the vitality of a community that appreciates its vibrant sense of place. In addition to a low cost of living and abundant natural amenities, the county offers a quality of life not often found in larger metropolitan areas. In 2015, an estimated 103,451 people called Craven County home, the U.S. Census Bureau says. Population density in Craven County was 146 people per square mile, the Census found.Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, in Craven County, is made up of more than 53,000 people, including active-duty and retired Marines, the civilian workforce and their families. Additionally, more than 13,000 veterans live in the area.The counties’ communities give newcomers plenty of choices when selecting a home. Enlist the help of a reputable real estate agent to help you sort through the area’s home options. The North Carolina Association of Realtors is a central source of local real estate information and services. Visit www.ncrealtors.org to find expertise and professional services for those interested in purchasing a new home.CRAVEN COUNTYCraven County was named after William, 1st Earl of Craven, son of a Lord Mayor of London and a soldier who, while fighting on the Continent during the English Civil War back home, fell madly in love with Elizabeth of Bohemia, sister to the embattled Charles I. As part of his wooing Craven threw financial support behind Charles, but after that monarch lost his head his son, Charles II, eventually ascended the English throne. Charles II rewarded Craven’s loyalty with an earldom, a share in the Colony of Carolina, which he served from afar as one of its Lord Proprietors, and court offices where he developed a reputation for bawdy language and generosity; during the Great Plague of London, he was among the few nobles who stayed, maintaining order and donating property for burials. In gratitude, Craven County took his name at its formation in 1712, though the earl himself had been dead 15 years. County seat New Bern had a river port and later, railways, and commerce and transportation brought wealth and culture to the whole area. Heavy fighting raged across the region during the Civil War, however, and battlegrounds are a significant part of county history.With the Croatan National Forest situated within the county, and access to several riverfronts and close proximity to Atlantic Ocean beaches, Craven County is perfect for outdoor reaction. For more information about where to go and what to see in the county, check out the New Bern Convention and Visitors Bureau website at www.visitnewbern.com.Communities in Craven County near Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point include Havelock and New Bern.HavelockP.O. Box 368Havelock, NC 28532 252-444-6400www.havelocknc.usLocated in Eastern North Carolina, midway between New Bern and the beaches of the Crystal Coast, Havelock has much to offer residents and visitors alike. The city’s 16.85 square miles are home to more than 20,000 residents.Havelock is one of eight cities in the world named after Sir Henry Havelock, a British officer in India who distinguished himself in 1857 during what was known as the Indian Mutiny. The area was originally named Havelock Station in the late 1850s, when the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad built a depot where its right of way crossed what is now Miller Boulevard.In 1940, Havelock became the home of Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point. The Naval Aviation Depot located on the air station provides employment opportunities for local residents. In 1959 the town was officially established.Situated at the edge of the Croatan National Forest, there are plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation in the area.The cost of living is below the national average by more than 10 percent. Median rent is $1,071, and selected monthly owner costs of housing units with a mortgage are $1,233. Mean travel time to work for those living in Havelock is 17 minutes.New Bern300 Pollock St.New Bern, NC 28560 252-636-4000www.newbern-nc.orgNew Bern was settled in 1710 by Swiss and Palatine German immigrants. The new colonists named the settlement after Bern, the capital of Switzerland and hometown of their leader Christoph von Graffenried. New Bern is the second-oldest European-American colonial town in North Carolina (after Bath). It served as the capital of the North Carolina colonial government, then briefly as the state capital. After the American Revolution, New Bern became wealthy and quickly developed a rich cultural life. That cultural life continues today with four historical districts recognized by the National Register of Historic Places. These areas provide much of New Bern’s unique charm, appeal to retirees and heritage tourism, and contribute to the city’s economic success. Even with its rich history, the city still has areas available for new development.The city serves as the county seat of Craven County, a distinction it has held since 1722. New Bern is 19 miles north of MCAS Cherry Point at the junction of the Neuse and Trent rivers, offering residents beautiful river views and walkways.This residential community is 28.23 square miles with a population of 30,070. Mean travel time to work for those who reside in New Bern is 19 minutes. Median rent in the city is $862, and selected monthly owner costs of housing units with a mortgage are $1,376.New Bern is notable for being the setting for two of Nicholas Sparks’ novels, “The Notebook” and “A Bend in the Road.”last_img read more

This Day in History: 1780 Hurricane hits Jamaica

first_imgOn this day in history, October 3, 1780, Jamaica was hit with one of the deadliest Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history.Savanna-la-Mar, also known as Sav-la-Mar, is a coastal town and capital of Westmoreland Parish, Jamaica. The town contained an 18th-century fort constructed for colonial defence against pirates in the Caribbean.In 1780, the town was completely destroyed by a powerful hurricane known as the Savanna-la-Mar hurricane. It was rebuilt, as the port was an important part of the Atlantic trade in sugar, slaves and other goods.On October 2 there was an unusual elevation of the sea, which then broke suddenly in on the town, and on its retreat swept every thing away with it. There were no buildings left standing in the town or in the area for 30 to 40 miles around it. Allegedly, it caused the sea to rise to such a degree that ships were found stranded amongst the trees. On the next day this was succeeded by the worst hurricane they had ever experienced, followed by an earthquake, which almost totally demolished every building in the parishes of Westmoreland, Hanover, part of St. James and some parts of St. Elizabeth.Jamaican folklore follows that the devastation of this western town as the work of the runaway slave known as Plato the Wizard, from beyond the grave. Just before his 1780 execution, the renowned obeahman pronounced a curse on Jamaica, predicting that his death would be avenged by a terrible storm set to befall the island before the end of that same year.last_img read more

Nigeria eases Visa processing for investors

first_imgNigeria government has improved the process of issuing Visa on arrival for foreign investors coming into the West African nation in efforts to improve the ease of doing business in the country reports Today.Vice President Yemi Osinbajo shared fresh insights into the government’s economic recovery efforts, explaining that Nigeria will be run like other investor friendly countries, and the government will ensure that it is easier for people to access all the different facilities that would make it easy to do business in the country.One of the major problems that foreign investors are encountering in Nigeria is accessing the country’s Visa which is shy the federal government of Nigeria is keen on introducing visa on arrival for investors.“One of the important innovations that we have introduced is that of visa on arrival. This process is one that is already in regulations. That usually involves your applying ahead and just taking up a visa. The actual visa on arrival process that we think will free off the process is one where you are able to arrive here and get your visa,” Osinbajo said.The vice President further added that creating the right environment for start-ups and business was critical to the government. Bureaucracy and corruption are major issues that entrepreneurs encounter while access to credit and land registration are some of the other issues.According to the VP“one of the ways we are trying to streamline the process is to ensure that a government department does not ask you to go and get a certification from another government department. It is the business of government departments to talk to each other and facilitate the process for the investor or the person who is doing the business.”last_img read more

Troost Family Thanks Sterling For Their ‘Miracle’

first_imgGaryn’s Funeral service is Saturday, September 24th at 10:00 am (9:00 am your time). You may watch it live at http://ccchowchilla.com go to Resources tab then click on Live Feed. In his obituary, the Troost family encouraged other parents to “pray for your children everyday and never pass up an opportunity to tell them “I Love You”.” Garyn was a graduate of Chowchilla High School and attended Fresno State before moving to Sterling, Alaska. His family describes Garyn as witty, humble, and a great friend who loved to skateboard, wake surf and play sports. His friends noted Garyn’s skill in playing drums, with his senior pictures photographer Lisa DeJager remembering, “He played the drums, on the bridge where we ended the shoot.  It was just past sunset and the sound of the music seemed to be amplified by the river below and the surrounding hills.  Just when Garyn was about to pack up his gear and call it a wrap, the fisherman below requested an encore.” To The Community of Sterling From The Troost Family      Thank you for your efforts to find our beloved son Garyn. For your love, unselfish acts of kindness, caring hearts and generosity. We are overwhelmed at how God placed you in our lives and hearts and of what care you showed us.     Jen Waller you are an Angel sent from above and I don’t know what we would have done without you:) Terry Johnston you are a very humble and giving man of your time, talents and wisdom, thank you for all you continue to do for us. Thank you for being willing to put your heart out there for those that are missing and their families, you will be blessed as you are a blessing to those that are helped.     To the searchers, oh my goodness, what a terrific group of men and women, giving of your own time to help a stranger is a true act of stewardship and kindness, we can never thank you enough. For the Solid Rock facility we thank you for housing us and our group while there, it was truly a blessing to be together. David Powell, God used you to give us our miracle and led you to our son. Thank you for your selfless act that has led to sorrow for what you have seen and we pray that you will be comforted by God, your family and community.     To the administrators of the Sterling Neighborhood page. Thank you for the time and effort you put into helping us get the word out about supplies and getting the people of your community to pray for us and to help us search for our son. For the pizza that was so generously donated by your local pizza place, for the drinks, snacks, flyers and everything else we are so grateful. Thank you to the Sterling Baptist Church for letting the command center be stationed there and to the secretary for her love and kindness. Most importantly thank you for the prayers that have been lifted up on behalf of our family. God sent you all at just the perfect time and we know he is carrying us through this dark time. To Pastor Scott Coffman and the College Heights Church thank you for praying with us and for finding transportation for our group, such a blessing. Isaiah 12:2 Surely God is my salvation: I will trust and not be afraid. The Lord, the Lord himself, is my strength ad my defense: he has become my salvation. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享News of 22-year-old Garyn Troost’s death was not the happy ending many searchers in Sterling had hoped for last week, but Garyn’s grieving mother Dana calls the discovery her ‘miracle.’center_img In an open letter to the Sterling community, Dana and Jeff Troost wrote that it’s only because of the 130+ searchers who spent three days hiking through the woods around Robinson Loop that they found their son’s body… Garyn passed away Sunday, September 11, after taking a short walk from the home where he was living in Sterling with long-time friends. Alaska State Troopers have not released the cause of death and out of respect for the family’s privacy, KSRM will not post any further details at this time. Donations in Memory of Garyn may be sent to Providence Christian School and Stone Ridge Christian High School Building Fund, 500 Buena Vista Drive, Merced, CA 95348.last_img read more

Dominica set for cricket comeback

first_img(Cricket West Indies) ST. JOHN’S, Antigua – Cricket is set to return to Dominica next year, when the Windward Islands Volcanoes host Trinidad & Tobago Red Force for a ninth-round match in the West Indies Championship (4-Day). Cricket West Indies announced yesterday the schedule of matches for the Championship which opens on Thursday, December 6. It revealed that Windsor Park, located in the heart of the Dominica capital of Roseau, will stage the match between the Volcanoes and Red Force from February 28 to March 3. “We are very elated to have been given this opportunity, since we have started to bounce back from the hurricane and on stream to host this regional match,” said Glen Joseph, the president of the Dominica Cricket Association.  “We are willing to take on the challenge, ensure that everything goes well and is successful. We are looking to put all the logistics in place so that there will be no issues. We are very excited, and we will ensure that we put our best foot forward.”Dominica has been off the cricket radar, since Hurricane Maria, a Category 5 system, dealt a devastating blow to the island on September 19 last year, but the island has steadily recovered.Windsor Park sustained little structural damage during the hurricane, but parts of the perimeter wall crumbled, sheets of galvanized roofing were blown off the stands and the floodlighting towers were bent out of shape. The venue was also used as a shelter for displaced residents following the hurricane, but Joseph said that was no longer the case and restoration work had started.“We hosted the World Creole Festival and Gospelfest concerts recently,” said Joseph.“I have spoken to government officials and they are hoping to complete all of the restoration work either in the first or second quarter of next year to ensure that the ground is ready in a bid to host international games next year.” The Volcanoes will remain under the spotlight when the Championship opens, as they face four-time, defending champions Guyana Jaguars at the Daren Sammy Cricket Ground in St. Lucia.Only one other first round match has been carded with Barbados Pride hosting Leeward Islands Hurricanes at the Three Ws Oval.  The other match between Trinidad & Tobago Red Force and Jamaica Scorpions has been pushed back to March at the Brian Lara Cricket Academy in Trinidad. The Championship is also well-placed for players, as almost half of the matches are due to be completed prior to the first Test between West Indies and England which starts on January 23 at Kensington Oval in Barbados – and the remainder will be played simultaneously with the Tour.“The season is designed to give all players an opportunity to impress the selectors prior to England landing on January 11 next year,” said CWI Manager, Cricket Operation, Roland Holder.“Basically, it’s four rounds of matches to impress, and consistency from all players – both with the bat and ball – would be welcomed. “If it’s a batsman, score consistently and not just one big score surrounded by a series of low scores. If it’s a bowler, take wickets and trouble the batsmen consistently, so that you are in the forefront of the selectors’ minds.”Six day/night contests are carded for the Championship which again features matches starting primarily on Thursdays.last_img read more

AP PHOTOS: Cuba’s tobacco country becomes tourist attraction

first_img In this March 1, 2016 photo, a picture of revolutionary hero Ernesto “Che” Guevara decorates a the wall inside a state-run warehouse where workers select tobacco leaves in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Tobacco operations receive tourists on group visits organized by state tourism agencies and foreigners by the hundreds receive lectures on Cuban tobacco. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, workers use both a horse-drawn cart and classic American car, to transport freshly collected tobacco leaves to a barn in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. The tobacco leaves will be hung to dry for almost two months before being sent off for cleaning and eventually rolled into cigars. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Yoberlan Castillo Garcia waits as one of his horses drinks water on the small tobacco farm he runs with his brother-in-law in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Garcia said they call the horses they rent to tourists “automatics” because they return on their own. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a tobacco worker spends the late afternoon grazing his horse on the roadside after hsi workday on the Yoandri Hernandez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Workers say they’re eager to see more benefits of Cuba’s increasing links to the outside world since the start of new relations with U.S., without losing the placid lifestyle of the last half-century. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a worker takes a break under drying tobacco leaves at the Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. The Montesino farm has been in the same family for three generations and is one of the most renowned Cuban tobacco producers. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a classic American car passes the Francisco Blanco tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. While foreign sales rose healthily last year, Cuban cigar industry officials say they have seen little impact on domestic sales from a boom in tourism that has brought hundreds of thousands of new visitors to Havana. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, a chicken looks at a freshly slaughtered pig that will be cooked up for tourists expected to visit the farm the next day on the Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Despite the flood of visitors since Cuba and the U.S. reestablished relations, some aspects of life in the province’s central Vinales valley have changed little. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this March 1, 2016 photo, workers play cards during their lunch break between drying tobacco leaves at a warehouse in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. The leaves are brought here to “breath” after being previously dipped in ammonium and water, and dried for at least two months. Depending on the leaf, tobacco is left to “breath” in a dark space from anywhere between two months to several years. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a man gives a girl a ride to school on the back of his bicycle in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, where tobacco is the main crop. Despite the flood of visitors since Cuba and the U.S. reestablished relations, some aspects of life in the province’s central Vinales valley have changed little. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, residents travel in a former school bus to the center of the town of Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, where tobacco farming is the main crop. Despite the flood of visitors since Cuba and the U.S. reestablished relations, some aspects of life in the province’s central Vinales valley have changed little. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this March 1, 2016 photo, women select and clean tobacco leaves inside a state-run warehouse in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. After the central vein is removed from each dried leaf, they’re dipped in ammonium and water and dried again for at least two months. The more years the leaves are allowed to dry, like wine, the more valuable they are considered by cigar enthusiasts, and called “reserve” cigars. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Andres Alvarez Hernandez holds his fighting cock while picking up powdered milk at a government-run store, paid for with a ration card, in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Hernandez, the nephew of a local tobacco farmer, works at a national park and is training his first cock to fight. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)center_img In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Yoberlan Castillo Garcia, 30, poses for a portrait in the doorway of the barn where tobacco leaves are dried on his family’s farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. The barn, made of dried palm leaves and wood, is also where they park a motorcycle and horse riding equipment. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, Jorge Luis Leon Becerra moves freshly picked tobacco leaves to a building where they will be dried on the Martinez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Farmers in Cuba’s tobacco country are benefiting from the tourist boom since the U.S. and Cuba reestablished relations by converting their farms into tourist attractions. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, a tobacco farm worker walks home after his workday in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Workers say they’re eager to see more benefits of Cuba’s increasing links to the outside world since the start of new relations with U.S., without losing the placid lifestyle of the last half-century. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Raul Valdes Villasusa, 76, smokes a cigar as he collects tobacco leaves on his farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Farmers earn money from the government for their tobacco crop, and keep a small portion for their own use. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, Marcelo Montesino, 92, right, and his son Eulogio Montesino, 55, pose inside the building where they dry tobacco leaves on their Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Eulogio, who said his father has the “health of steel” thanks to eating farm-grown organic food his entire life, hopes to one day create a cigar brand named in his father’s honor. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 25, 2016 photo, workers sacrifice a pig to be cooked up for tourists expected to visit the farm the next day on the Montesino tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Despite the flood of visitors, some aspects of life in the province’s central Vinales valley have changed little. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 27, 2016 photo, Raul Valdes Villasusa, 76, shows his hands, hardened by years of work on his tobacco farm in Vinales in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Villasusa, who grew up on his family’s farm, said his operation is organic, not using any chemicals on his crop. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) In this Feb. 26, 2016 photo, Jorge Luis Leon Becerra, 43, waits on his oxcart for workers to bring their freshly picked tobacco leaves before takinge them to a warehouse for drying at the Martinez tobacco farm in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Unseasonably heavy rains have damaged Cuba’s tobacco crop and raised questions about iconic cigar brands that some aficionados hope will not suffer from declining quality amid higher demand. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) VINALES, Cuba | Unseasonably heavy rains have damaged Cuba’s tobacco crop and raised questions about iconic cigar brands that some aficionados hope will not suffer from declining quality amid higher demand.And while foreign sales rose healthily last year, Cuban cigar industry officials say they have seen little impact on domestic sales from a boom in tourism that has brought hundreds of thousands of new visitors to Havana. That may be partly because while some tourists visit official cigar stores, many others buy pilfered or counterfeit substandard smokes on the street, further damaging the image of the Cuban cigar. Still, the industry’s problems haven’t kept farmers in Cuba’s tobacco country from benefiting from the tourist boom by converting their farms into tourist attractions, where busloads of foreign visitors can delight meals of roast pork, rice and beans and rum drinks.The Montesino farm in Pinar del Rio province has been in the same family for three generations and is one of the most renowned Cuban tobacco producers. Each day, it receives tourists on group visits organized by state tourism agencies. Foreigners by the hundreds receive lectures on Cuban tobacco along with a meal and cocktails.Despite the flood of visitors, some aspects of life in the province’s central Vinales valley have changed little. Parents take their children to school on bicycles. Farmers haul tobacco leaves to be dried on ox-drawn carts. Tobacco workers nap under racks of drying leaves.Workers say they’re eager to see more benefits of Cuba’s increasing links to the outside world since the start of new relations with U.S., without losing the placid lifestyle of the last half-century.last_img read more

Nar Nar Goon grieves after shock death

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS MEMBERS of the Nar Nar Goon and wider community were rocked last week after the shocking death…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Last drink before the final farewell

first_imgRetired newspaperman MICHAEL GIULIANO was moved to see a series of stories in the Gazette last month recounting the tragic…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Bunyip River on flood watch

first_imgBy Mitchell Clarke The State Emergency Service (SES) has issued a flood watch for the Bunyip River. A cold front will be crossing…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img