COJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual Returns

first_imgCOJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual ReturnsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Photo: Mark BellChief Executive Officer of the Companies Office of Jamaica, Judith Ramlogan (centre), gives details of the two-month amnesty that the entity will be undertaking May 4 to June 30, 2015, at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on April 23. Looking on are: Customer Service Manager, Inger Hainsley-Bennett (left) and Deputy CEO, Shellie Leon. COJ Grants Amnesty to File Outstanding Annual Returns CommerceApril 24, 2015Written by: Kadian Brown FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Advertisements Story HighlightsThe Companies Office of Jamaica (COJ) will be embarking on a two-month amnesty to facilitate the filing of outstanding annual returns; removal of companies and closure of business names from its register.The amnesty will last from May 4 to June 30, 2015.CEO of the COJ, Judith Ramlogan, explained that the amnesty will allow companies limited by shares (company formed to make a profit) to file each outstanding annual return at a cost of $3,000, down from $5,000 or 60 per cent of the regular cost.center_img RelatedIndustry Ministry Strengthening Institutional Capacity RelatedGov’t to Sign US$5 Billion Logistics Hub MoU Monday RelatedMore Women in the Workforce Will Grow the Economy – Ffolkes Abrahams The Companies Office of Jamaica (COJ) will be embarking on a two-month amnesty to facilitate the filing of outstanding annual returns; removal of companies and closure of business names from its register.The amnesty will last from May 4 to June 30, 2015.Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ on April 23, Chief Executive Officer of the COJ, Judith Ramlogan, explained that the amnesty will allow companies limited by shares (company formed to make a profit) to file each outstanding annual return at a cost of $3,000, down from $5,000 or 60 per cent of the regular cost.“There is a penalty of $100 charged for each day that the annual return is outstanding up to a maximum of $10,000…the amnesty will allow for this penalty charge to be waived, so companies will not have to pay the penalty,” Mrs. Ramlogan pointed out.Companies limited by guarantee or non-profit companies, will file annual returns at a cost of $1,000 each or 50 per cent of the regular cost.For the amnesty period, companies may be removed from the register for a flat fee of $10,000 without having to file all outstanding documents or provide an audit certificate. There will be no late fees, penalties, removal or advertising fee charged as would have been the case prior to the amnesty.“The amnesty offers persons who own business names that have been registered but never renewed to close those business names for a flat fee of $2,000,” the CEO pointed out, adding that “usually, if you have a business name that has never been renewed and you want to close that business name, you would have to pay all outstanding renewal fees, but this amnesty allow you to request removal or closure and pay a fee of $2,000 with no late or renewal fees charged.”Highlighting the challenges which led to the decision for the amnesty, Mrs. Ramlogan outlined that as at December 2014, there were 86,994 companies on the Companies Register with 51,755 or 59.5 per cent of that number being delinquent.“More than half of the companies on the Register have failed to file one or more documents with the Registrar of Companies,” she highlighted.The CEO noted too, that up to December 2014, 125,846 Business Names had been registered by the Companies Office and of that number, 80,424 had expired, but had never been renewed or closed.She pointed out that in addition to the significant reduction in cost during the amnesty period, companies and businesses will get the opportunity to become compliant.“The amnesty will benefit Jamaica in general as there will be a more accurate and current companies register and for the businesses, if you are compliant, there are benefits such as gaining easier access to financing, as banks do not deal with companies that are not compliant,” she added.last_img read more

ip.access CEO: Small cells now delivering on promise

first_img Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelona Home ip.access CEO: Small cells now delivering on promise Asia Previous Article2degrees trials first unlimited data plan in New ZealandNext ArticleSprint to end undercut promotion in face of unlimited Tags Michael doesn’t want to admit that he has been a journalist and editor for close to 20 years covering a diverse set of subjects including shipping and shipbuilding, fixed and mobile telecoms, and motorcycling…More Read more Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities Authorcenter_img Related Michael Carroll Nokia scores Philippines 5G deal with Dito EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Malcolm Gordon, CEO of small cell provider ip.access (pictured), told Mobile World Live the industry should not wait for 5G technology to become a reality before tackling gaps in network coverage.Gordon explained “5G is obviously something that we do”, but added ip.access “can deliver everything that we need to deliver with our current technology”.The small cell technology at ip.access’ disposal today is enabling it to meet “pent up demand for in building coverage”, the bulk of which is coming from the enterprise sector, he said.Gordon explained the small cell market is turning a corner after many years of under delivering on its promise to improve coverage, and noted emerging technologies including IoT offer a promising new revenue stream for ip.access and other companies.“We think the small cells business needs additional revenue streams and certainly IoT is definitely a strong revenue stream improver for us, and we’ll embrace it fully,” Gordon said.IoT also enables ip.access to meet its goal of offering businesses “good coverage” and services, and also “additional means of generating revenue.”Click here to find out what else Gordon had to say, including details of ip.access’ goals for 2017 in terms of partnerships and target markets. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 05 APR 2017 5GIoTip.accesssmall cellslast_img read more

“Very gradual return”: Wall Street tenants, landlords lay out reopening plans

first_imgWall Street firms and their landlords are making plans to welcome a trickle of employees back into their buildings as New York slowly reopens. (Getty)When Wall Street employees return to work, there will be a very different office awaiting them.New York City’s reopening kicked off on Monday, and offices are set to be allowed to operate at 50 percent capacity in a matter of weeks. Financial workers will be returning to a new normal, with body temperature scans and socially distanced elevators, the New York Times reports.“There’s a high degree of anxiety, as you can imagine,” RXR Realty CEO Scott Rechler told the Times. “Officing is going to be different than it was before.”RXR, whose tenants include financial firms like UBS and Bank of America, has created an app to help tenants coordinate workdays and arrival times, minimizing social contact. Workers will also be able to view heat maps of restrooms, and request deep cleaning of workstations with the scan of a QR code.Even with precautions in place, it appears likely that a large portion of the workforce will continue to opt to work from home well into the coming year. A recent poll by the Partnership for New York City found that companies expected just 10 percent of their employees to return to the office by August 15, and just 29 percent by year’s end.“There’s a sense that a significant portion of workers will continue to work remotely,” Partnership president and CEO Kathryn Wylde said, noting that it would be a “very gradual return.”Because of the logistical challenges of reopening, many companies are taking their time. Private equity firm TPG plans to keep employees working at home until after Labor Day, as does the Carlyle Group. Hedge fund Point72 and private equity firm Bain Capital have not yet set a timeline for returning to the office. [NYT] — Kevin Sun This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more