Sky says markets watchdog must look at BT Openreach

first_img Charlotte Henry Henry Show Comments ▼ Sky wants media regulator Ofcom to launch a full investigation into the UK’s broadband market and get the competition watchdog involved.Yesterday, Sky published the evidence it has submitted to Ofcom, which highlights what Sky considers to be the low quality service offered by BT’s Openreach division, which runs the UK’s telecoms network. Sky’s broadband customers rely on access to the Openreach network, but the company said they are regularly failed by Openreach.Sky argues that it takes 10 days or longer for Openreach engineers to attend 90 per cent of new line installations, with Sky customers’ fitting dates changing 36,000 times a month, in the year to March 2015.Other complaints include Openreach’s long repair times. Sky believes BT does not invest enough in Openreach, which it said subsequently meant that service innovation is stifled. The so-called final mile of cabling which delivers broadband into people’s homes, and is critical in determining the browsing speed users get, is still done by copper wire, which is much slower than fibre optic cabling.Sky’s chief strategy officer Mai Fyfield said:Ofcom should move quickly to ask the Competition and Markets Authority to undertake a full competition inquiry.BT hit back last night and said:The forthcoming Ofcom review is an important piece of work so it is disappointing that Sky are engaging in selective spin rather than constructive dialogue.A BT spokesperson added that it has passed all sixty of the Openreach service targets it was set by Ofcom. Share whatsapp Tuesday 30 June 2015 5:17 am Sky says markets watchdog must look at BT Openreach Tags: BT Group Company Sky More From Our Partners Sidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com whatsapplast_img read more

FDA review casts doubt on first drug for combating Duchenne

first_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Update: At the advisory committee meeting on Nov. 24, most panel members voiced doubts that the treatment was effective. A final FDA decision on drisapersen is expected by Dec. 27.The fate of a drug to combat Duchenne muscular dystrophy may be in doubt after Food and Drug Administration staff raised serious concerns about the safety and effectiveness of the treatment. The assessment was contained in documents released on Friday in advance of an FDA advisory panel meeting next week to review BioMarin Pharmaceutical’s drisapersen, one of two new experimental medicines for DMD slated for regulatory review.Listen to the Signal podcast: For boys with Duchenne, and two drug companies, a moment of shared hopeThe FDA reviewers cited “life-threatening” side effects, such as a low blood platelet count and severe kidney damage. They also noted a lack of “substantial evidence” of effectiveness, pointing to a failed late-stage study and an inability to substantiate findings from a mid-stage study showing the mobility of boys taking the drug improved after a six-minute walking test. And they argued that the BioMarin drug did not seem to boost levels of dystrophin, the protein that is missing in boys with DMD and which is meant to be restored by the treatment.advertisement Tags BioMarin Pharmaceuticalduchenne muscular dystrophyFDASarepta Therapeutics @Pharmalot “The development program for drisapersen is extensive for a rare disease and exemplary,” the FDA reviewers wrote. “It is very disappointing that both clinical and biomarker data for drisapersen are inconclusive at this time.”Read more: The fight to save children’s lives — and reshape the FDAThe FDA staff stopped short of recommending that the agency not approve the drug. However, by reading between the lines, that seemed to be the take-away for most industry analysts. “In our view, FDA has made a very clear statement that there is no reason to approve drisapersen,” wrote R.W. Baird analyst Brian Skorney in an investor’s note.advertisement Max and Austin Leclaire both have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Families have been lobbying the FDA to approve new therapies for the rare disease. Kayana Szymczak for STAT [email protected] center_img Opinion remains divided, however, over what this review will mean for Sarepta Therapeutics, the company with a rival drug called eteplirsen that will be considered by an FDA review panel in January. Leerink analyst Joseph Schwartz thought it did not bode well for the competing treatment. But Needham analyst Chad Messer wrote the Sarepta drug has demonstrated greater safety and effectiveness — albeit in a randomized study of only 12 patients, four of whom received a placebo.One surprise of the briefing documents was that the agency will not ask its panel of outside experts — none of whom are DMD specialists — to vote on whether the agency should recommend the drug. This should give the agency more leeway in its final approval decision as it struggles to balance the demands of families afflicted by the DMD with the need for scientific rigor. PharmalotFDA review casts doubt on first drug for combating Duchenne About the Author Reprints Ed Silverman By Ed Silverman Nov. 20, 2015 Reprintslast_img read more

Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings

first_imgPharmalot @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Tags jobspharmaceuticalsSTAT+ What is it? By Ed Silverman March 17, 2017 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included?center_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Hired someone new and exciting? Promoting a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot?Share the news with us, and we’ll share it with others. That’s right. Send us your changes, and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going. Alex Hogan/STAT Ed Silverman [email protected] Log In | Learn More Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings last_img read more

What it’s like to be a Hollywood director making an ad for Pfizer

first_img What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags pharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED A sample image from Stromberg’s Pfizer ad. Courtesy Pfizer Pharma What it’s like to be a Hollywood director making an ad for Pfizer By Rebecca Robbins Sept. 15, 2017 Reprints GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. If Pfizer’s latest ad looks to you like a visual effects-heavy Hollywood film, it’s by design.The beaming couples and natural landscapes typical of pharma ads have been replaced by dreamlike scenes of a giant sailing ship, a launching rocket, and twin-sized beds flapping their wings through the clouds. And no, Pfizer (PFE) wouldn’t disclose the ad’s budget. What is it? Log In | Learn More last_img read more

Let #MeToo be a catalyst towards removing gender bias in STEM

first_img Karin Lachmi Related: The most severe cases of harassment I’ve lived through, in both the business and research setting, are especially difficult for me to share publicly. But I have come to accept that the discomfort in thinking about and sharing these experiences is also the imperative for me to share.I once received an invitation from a prominent Sand Hill Road venture capitalist to join him in a Jacuzzi for a “meeting.” I have been inexplicably and unexpectedly forced to kiss an investor in the middle of a business meeting.As a researcher, I encountered sexual harassment at the critical and final stage of securing my Ph.D. — my search for a principal investigator. After identifying the top experts in my field, I secured a meeting with a highly respected professor. It was the equivalent of a budding musician meeting her lifelong idol. I was starstruck, and spent days preparing my research ideas. But as I gave him an overview of my dissertation, I realized the meeting was taking a turn for the worse. The professor, a male who, to my knowledge, is still a professor, was conducting a head-to-toe scan of my body and coyly smiling. I stopped mid-conversation to address this uncomfortable situation. He chuckled and unabashedly said, “Sorry, but if I must be honest, you are just much more intelligent than you look.” About the Author Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: Looking back on that episode, I want to believe that if the same thing happened to me today I would speak up and even report him. But at the time I didn’t do that. While I ultimately found another principal investigator, secured my Ph.D., and continued my professional development in the field, the same might not be true of other young women at a similar, or worse, crossroad.While this scenario could, of course, still happen in an environment where more women are in positions of authority (women are not the only victims of sexual harassment, as we saw recently in the Kevin Spacey scandal), perhaps it would be the rare exception instead of an all-too-familiar story. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found that significant power disparities between men and women in the workplace is a top risk factor for harassment. This harassment can, in turn, further perpetuate the status quo, making the respective field that much more challenging for a woman to succeed in, advance in, or enter to begin with. This, of course, extends beyond STEM.But STEM is a field grounded in facts, hard data, and repetition. We’ve “repeated” enough tests, surveys, and studies of gender bias and sexual harassment, and we’ve reviewed the data. Now it’s time to take this moment to actively carve a path forward and join other industries in rooting out gender-based workplace harassment. Related: Privacy Policy Sadly, I know that my female peers on both the research and business sides of STEM don’t find these statistics surprising, as many of us have experienced some form of bias, discrimination, or harassment during our careers. For me, it sometimes comes in the form of what appear to be “minor” incidents — whether it is being questioned on my professionalism or having business conversations directed solely towards my male colleagues. Then there are the cases where my ideas and decisions are ignored when I share them, but they are enthusiastically accepted when they come from a man. I’ve been frequently interrupted and talked over (mansplaining). Sometimes in emails where I am very obviously a contributing member to the discussion, I have had colleagues treat me as a scheduling administrator because I was the only female name on the thread.advertisement BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images From a leadership perspective, companies and academic institutions large and small across STEM need to commit to “50 Percent in All” — equal representation of women on management teams, boards of directors, and all decision-making committees. To reach a point where this is possible, all executives in power today must leverage their positions of authority to find, discover, and cultivate talented women for leadership positions.Similarly, women who are advancing in their careers and research need to rise up. Take comfort and courage from the brave stories of the women who’ve shared their #MeToo story. Speak up, reach out (and up), and seek all opportunities for growth early and often. If we approach this from both ends and apply the rigor and mindset of STEM disciplines to the drive to bring about change, STEM can be a driving force in addressing gender equality.Karin Lachmi, Ph.D., is co-founder, chief scientific officer, and president of Bioz. She previously served as managing director of the western region of the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center U.S. Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts.center_img The now-viral #MeToo social campaign has been tweeted about nearly 2 million times by men and women in 85 countries, leaving me with a sense of hope — and one of frustration. These posts are often accompanied by stories of encounters that range from gross to humiliating to horrific.The campaign has untied years of silence for thousands of women who were sexually harassed but kept quiet, and silence by women and men who knew what was occurring but did nothing about it. It has become a blunt indictment of the sexual balance of power that exists today between men and women in the Western world.As a woman in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and a biotech entrepreneur, I have seen and experienced firsthand the challenges and struggles that women in male-dominated professions face every day. But while there is no overnight fix in any industry or sector, I believe the STEM industries play a critical role in the path to removing gender biases and sexual harassment in the workplace.advertisement The data and research on implicit biases and the discrimination that affects women in STEM are well-documented. For example, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that two-thirds of women in biomedical research have personally experienced “gender bias in professional advancement,” and one-third have experienced sexual harassment. Furthermore, STEM had its own “Harvey Weinstein” moment just over a year ago with Geoffrey Marcy, a well-known astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley. Female scientists face gender bias in NIH grant process Please enter a valid email address. By Karin Lachmi Nov. 8, 2017 Reprints First OpinionLet #MeToo be a catalyst towards removing gender bias in STEM [email protected] Female scientists report pervasive gender bias, sexual harassment Tags advocacybiotechnologywomen’s healthlast_img read more

Tributes paid to former Postmaster as Post Office in Ballinakill closes

first_img By Siun Lennon – 29th June 2018 Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Community Twitter Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Home News Community Tributes paid to former Postmaster as Post Office in Ballinakill closes NewsCommunity Facebook Twitter Tributes paid to former Postmaster as Post Office in Ballinakill closes Community center_img TAGSAidan KennedyBallinakillBallinakill post office Pinterest Previous articleThe Big Five: Another Leinster final, a national hurling final as well as some tasty league finals and play-offsNext articleVacant Council seat to be filled in July while one candidate ‘refused interview’ Siun Lennonhttp://heresosiun.blogspot.ie/2016/09/the-lekkie-piccie-experience.htmlSiún Lennon joined LaoisToday in a full-time capacity after studying Journalism and New Media in the University of Limerick. She hails from Rosenallis and her interests vary from news, sports and politics. Council New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening “It’s disappointing but he knows it has to end. It’s a pity it’s closing – but that’s way things are gone. People don’t tend to use the Post Office the way they used to,” he added.Local councillor John Joe Fennelly said that the closure and Aidan Kennedy’s reitrement brings, ‘great sadness to the village’.“I was saddened to hear about the post office closing. Aidan Kennedy’s service and character will be missed. People will miss the days of going into the post office and getting all the talk about the town,” said cllr Fennelly.Incredible service to the wider Ballinakill community Aidan has not just given his time to the post office, but has also been heavily involved in the wider community for over 50 years – most notably in Ballinakill GAA local bingo nights and the church choir.Indeed he served as secretary of Ballinakilll GAA club for 42 years.“Aidan has held almost every position in Ballinakill GAA for the last 50 years,” said current Ballinakill GAA Secretary Mairead Fitzpatrick.“The club made a presentation to him two years ago for his service to the GAA. The Post Office will be hugely missed,” Mairead added.Aidan previously spoke to LaoisToday when he celebrated 50 years as Postmaster in Ballinakill.There have been tough times throughout the 50 years – he has been robbed twice, most recently in 2014. “You’d be on edge and always nervous you’d make mistakes. You have to balance it every night – it’s not a big job but the computers can make a mistake too.”But for Aidan, the positives far outweigh the negatives – “meeting people, earning a few bob and helping to rear a family.”He heaped praise on his wife Sadie for her support over the years, particularly in recent times when he had a hip replacement and with his lung fibrosis.The announcement that the facility was going to be discontinued in Ballinakill was criticised by two Laois TDs.“The closure of the post office due to retirement of the Post Master is a blow to the village of Ballinakill and the surrounding areas,” said Deputy Brian Stanley. Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Aidan’s son Declan spoke to us about his father’s retirement and the closure of Ballinakill’s post office.“He’s sad but it’s also a bit of a relief – he’s 81 years old and ideally he needs to slow down now. He has lung fibrosis and only for that he would stay going to the grave,” said Declan. WhatsApp “This facility has provided valuable services to the community for several generations,” he added.Population increase“The population of the village and the surrounding area has increased in recent years. It is also important to note that An Post intend rolling out a programme of reform and are to have a greater range of service provided through the post office network.“An Post should advertise the contract for the Ballinakill Post Office to ascertain the level of interest and keep the option open of co-locating it with an existing business,” he added.Deputy Sean Fleming also hit out at the Government, saying there is “an anti rural bias”.“This announcement in Ballinakill follows an earlier Government announcement a couple of years ago to close the Garda Station in Ballinakill,” he said.“The Government is essentially withdrawing all key Government services from rural villages.“Ballinakill is not the only village to have suffered this similar fate by this Government. In recent times they have facilitated the closure of the Post Office and Garda Station in Ballacolla also.“There is an anti rural bias in this Government, they believe most people, services and employment should be based in the greater Dublin area.”SEE ALSO – Two men beaten with hurls victims of ‘homophobic attack’ It’s the end of an era in Ballinakill as the long-running Post Office will close its doors one last time this Saturday, June 30, at 1pm.Aidan Kennedy took over the Post Office in Ballinakill on April 10, 1967, and since then he has seen many people go through its green doors.He began running the Post Office following the death of his mother Jane. Prior to that, his aunt Julia – his father’s sister – had run it. Between them they’ve ran the Post Office right back almost to the foundation of the state. Initially the office was in his house in the village but they’ve been in their current premises since 1992.last_img read more

Private equity investors expect attractive returns: survey

first_img Canadian plan sponsors see positive results in Q2 Related news The survey finds that most (82%) LPs are expecting the PE sector to produce annual net returns of at least 11% over the next three to five years. And, most of the remainder (17%) anticipate annual net returns of more than 16%. Notwithstanding this rosy outlook, the survey also finds that about 60% of PE investors expect returns to decline over the subsequent five to 10 years as the industry matures. Just 7% of LPs anticipate returns to increase in the longer term. The research also looks trends such as gender equity, artificial intelligence (AI), and the PE industry’s approach to the burgeoning marijuana sector. Overall, the survey finds that respondents believe the proportion of women working in the PE business will rise in the years ahead. According to the survey, 72% of LPs expect the ratio of women at GPs will increase over the next three years, and over half (55%) say that the representation of women at LPs will increase, too. When it comes to improving gender representation, respondents indicate that they favour firms adopting aspirational targets, but not quotas, in hiring and in the composition of investment committees. Only one in 20 PE investors say they would support the use of hiring quotas. Two-thirds of LPs expect to see the industry start utilizing AI tools within the next five years, according to the survey. LP investors’ views on the marijuana industry are mixed. Although a majority surveyed are leery of the recreational marijuana businesses, a majority (57%) of would buy into businesses dedicated to medicinal uses. Only 30% are open to recreational marijuana businesses. Private equity has been slow to go green, but that may be changing James Langton Keywords Private equity center_img More female investors and the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) are all seen coming to the private equity (PE) business in the next few years, according to according the latest Global Private Equity Barometer published Monday from London U.K.-based Coller Capital. The survey published on Monday captures views of 110 PE investors from around the world during autumn 2017. Limited partners (LPs) are investors in private equity funds. General partners (GPs) are private equity fund managers. Canadian equities were worst hit asset type for fund managers in Q1, report says Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Jane O’Dwyer to lead CRC Association

first_imgJane O’Dwyer to lead CRC Association Cooperative Research Centres AssociationJane O’Dwyer, currently Vice-President (Engagement and Global Relations) at The Australian National University will become the Chief Executive Officer of the Cooperative Research Centres Association (CRC Association) in January 2021. She will succeed Tony Peacock, who has led the CRC Association for the past decade with great distinction.“We are delighted to have Jane join us after what was a highly competitive process,” said CRC Association Chair, Belinda Robinson. “Her leadership skills, energy and unique experience across peak bodies, industry, academia, media and politics, make her an ideal fit to lead the organisation in its next chapter.”“Along with my colleagues on the Board, I’m looking forward to working with Jane to support and represent our members and advance the benefits of cooperative research in Australia.”“I would also again like to thank Tony and recognise the tremendous work he has done for the CRC Association and the Australian innovation community. He has been very well respected by our members and stakeholders and I would like to wish him and his wife Ros the absolute best for his next chapter.”Jane joins the CRC Association after a more than 25-year career that has spanned Australia, Japan and the United States. Commencing her career as a political advisor, Jane held key roles in the Australian Local Government Association and Sports Medicine Australia. She joined ANU more than 15 years ago after 4 years in Japan, and has been a close and trusted advisor to three consecutive ANU Vice-Chancellors across media and public affairs, policy, international relations and global engagement. She spent three years in the United States, where she established the ANU North America Liaison Office attached to the Australian Embassy in Washington DC.Ms O’Dwyer holds a Bachelor of Arts (Curtin), Masters degrees in Management (ANU) and Journalism (Wollongong) and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She is Deputy Chair of the Canberra Writer’s Festival and a Director of the Canberra Convention Bureau.“I’m delighted to join the CRC Association and know I follow in the footsteps of a highly respected and active CEO in Tony Peacock. Cooperative Research Centres are a great Australian success story, and a testament to the profound national value of industry-university research cooperation. “I relish the opportunity to work with the Board to write the next chapter for the CRC Association at a time when research and the development, and retention, of a highly skilled research workforce that can transition between universities and industry, will be essential to emerge from the impacts of COVID-19.“Cooperative research is critical to Australia’s future.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:america, Australia, Australian, Australian National University, Canberra, community, covid-19, Government, innovation, Japan, Local Government, North America, sports medicine, United States, university, Washingtonlast_img read more

SEQ fuel price cycles driven by same servos

first_imgSEQ fuel price cycles driven by same servos Griffith University researchers have found evidence of price leaders influencing the pattern of fuel prices in Greater Brisbane and Gold Coast in the latest update on the Queensland Fuel Price Reporting Scheme (QFRS).Lead author Associate Professor Parvinder Kler from Griffith Business School says the latest data allowed the team to pinpoint the beginning of fuel price cycles based on a handful of operators.“One of the benefits for SEQ motorists is that other petrol stations won’t necessarily react immediately, giving consumers time to save at the bowser if they’re using fuel price apps powered by Queensland Fuel Price Reporting data during a rising price cycle.”According to the report, price cycles lasted 27 days on average after fuel prices begin to rise.“There tended to be only three or four retailers kickstarting the fuel price cycle. This doesn’t mean all of a brand’s retailers behaved the same way, rather we found it was particular bowser locations that would go first.“There are many different owners of brand franchises, so we concentrated on business owners of the servos and the same three or four were consistently the first to increase their prices and the rest would eventually follow.”Associate Professor Kler says the real time price tracking data suggests Queensland’s Fuel Watch Scheme produces different price cycles to Western Australia which requires retailers to lodge prices the day before.“This leads to more predictable price fluctuations they tend to go up one day and come down another day in the week.“In Queensland, particularly in the Greater Brisbane and Gold Coast areas we don’t see that, retailers can change their price at any time, which makes it complicated.“Whenever these few petrol stations decide to hike or lower their prices, it sets the price point for everyone else and a cycle begins. But we don’t see this play out in regional areas.”The 18-month milestone report estimates the scheme has saved consumers using unleaded fuel products about $8 million in Brisbane and about $9.8 million in Southeast Queensland per year. Brisbane motorists filling up at the minimum price could save about $147 per year while Gold Coast and Ipswich residents could save $129 and $144 respectively at the pump.Griffith University has been engaged by the Queensland Government to provide an expert independent assessment of the QFRS and will deliver a final report in 2021. /University Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Brisbane, business, gold, Gold Coast, Government, Griffith, Griffith University, Ipswich, petrol, price, Professor, Queensland, school, university, Western Australialast_img read more

Rye outdoor trading abandoned

first_imgRye outdoor trading abandoned After feedback from local business owners at Rye late last week, Mornington Peninsula Shire has made the decision to remove the temporary outdoor dining and trading space along Point Nepean Road.Several Rye businesses who had applied for outdoor trading permits have now decided not to use the newly created space. This reduction in demand for outdoor dining and trading means the space is no longer viable.The Rye outdoor dining and trading space was one of many installed in townships across the Peninsula to help local businesses bounce back from lockdown and keep our community COVID-safe this summer.Trading outdoors allows local businesses to maximise their trade under the State Government’s ongoing density limitations.Is it important to remember that physical distancing requirements are still in force, which includes maximum numbers of people in any commercial indoor area, whether it be retail, professional services or hospitality.Elsewhere on the Peninsula, outdoor dining and trading continues at Blairgowrie, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, McCrae, Rosebud and Sorrento. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:business, community, Force, Government, local council, lockdown, Mornington Peninsula, space, trade, Victorialast_img read more